Event Title

[Pn. 5] Bypassing my Identity: My Life as a Queer Fatshionista before and after Weight Loss Surgery

Location

HPC2 150

Panel

Health, Bodies and Identity

Abstract

This poster presentation intends to look at my journey before and after weight loss surgery. Before having a gastric bypass surgery, I was well entrenched in the Health at Every Size (HAES) movement. I was a part of the Fatshionista community, and carried a “Fancy Fat Femme” sign on the Boston Dyke March. In my graduate school, I served as president of a size-positive group. But after a series of medical diagnoses and three doctors’ opinions indicated I would be eligible for weight-loss surgery, I had to do some soul searching. This poster will use bits of my poems and journal entries to form a narrative of my experience, through the preliminary psychological screening and support groups, the dietician visits, and finally, life after surgery. I’ll explore my own understanding of my body through a fat studies, queer theory lens; and how the medical model tended to subvert my thinking. Finally, I will consider how the weight-loss surgery community might benefit from a HAES perspective.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 19th, 3:45 PM Oct 19th, 5:45 PM

[Pn. 5] Bypassing my Identity: My Life as a Queer Fatshionista before and after Weight Loss Surgery

HPC2 150

This poster presentation intends to look at my journey before and after weight loss surgery. Before having a gastric bypass surgery, I was well entrenched in the Health at Every Size (HAES) movement. I was a part of the Fatshionista community, and carried a “Fancy Fat Femme” sign on the Boston Dyke March. In my graduate school, I served as president of a size-positive group. But after a series of medical diagnoses and three doctors’ opinions indicated I would be eligible for weight-loss surgery, I had to do some soul searching. This poster will use bits of my poems and journal entries to form a narrative of my experience, through the preliminary psychological screening and support groups, the dietician visits, and finally, life after surgery. I’ll explore my own understanding of my body through a fat studies, queer theory lens; and how the medical model tended to subvert my thinking. Finally, I will consider how the weight-loss surgery community might benefit from a HAES perspective.