Event Title

Session One: Panel 1 - The State, Dependency and Protection

Location

Marsh Hall 101

Start Date

17-10-2009 10:30 AM

End Date

17-10-2009 12:00 PM

Description

Iranian Immigrant Women in Canada: “Economic Security Among Iranian Immigrant Lone Mothers in Vancouver” (Giti Eghbal Kalvir)

Immigrant population refers to populations that are largely foreign born and granted immigration status by the Canadian immigration authorities. The proportion of the BC, Canada immigrant population has increased rapidly due to the high inflow of immigrants in the last few years. Since 1993, BC has become the second most popular province of destination for Canadian immigrants. From one point of view, immigrants are those who have kept Canada growing and prospering. On the other hand, immigrants have dealt with different sensitive issues such as language barrier, work skills expectation, degraded education and of course poverty.

Iranian Immigrant single mothers face a host of structural barriers to economic independence and their full integration to Canadian society. The poverty situation of immigrant single mothers resulting from low employability have been the focus of recent studies bringing forth a host of issues that demands further analysis, discussion and debate. Having said that, this research will examine why immigrant single mothers - - most specifically Iranian immigrant single mothers - - face lower employment rates; are less likely to work on a full–year, full-time basis; and have fewer opportunities to work in occupations requiring a university degree. By illustrating how the situation is even more difficult for Iranian immigrant single mothers who have to combine work and parenting responsibilities amidst the myriad of other problems that result from their gender and marital status. Yet, in spite of all the challenges, like all other single mothers in this country, Iranian immigrant single mothers constitute a back-to-back representation of the challenges faced by women and of the barriers in the lives of immigrants.

This paper is seeking to analyze immigrant women and most specifically Iranian immigrant single mothers contributing factor to the prevalence of persistent poverty among women from visible minority groups. As part of the conclusion , this paper will detail why special attention should be focused on the needs of those most likely to be living in poverty such as Iranian immigrant single mother households. Developing and suggesting some strategies to confront systematic racism and sexism, creating safe area for immigrant women to talk about their needs and experience, social security, seeing through the lens of the individual needs, contribution and responsibility could be mentioned as some of the out come through out this research.

Race/Gender/Sexuality and Government Assistance: The Case of Hurricane Katrina (Megan Reid)

In this paper I address the relationship between the federal government and displaced survivors of Hurricane Katrina in the context of FEMA’s post-disaster housing assistance program. I examine the specific ways FEMA’s informal practices deterred people in need from obtaining assistance. Hurricane survivors were deterred from applying for or following through with FEMA assistance programs through three informal practices: making applicants wait an undisclosed amount of time for all aspects of the assistance, treating applicants in way they interpreted to be rude and inhumane, and giving out incorrect or contradictory information regarding what applicants were eligible for, what assistance money was to be spent on, and how long assistance would be distributed. I consider this in the context of the trend towards a neoliberal welfare state and its reliance on a gendered, raced, and sexualized construction of poverty for justification. Though disaster victims are usually considered to be the “deserving poor,” when disaster victims turned out to be largely members of groups considered to be undeserving, the government response was run more like a contemporary welfare program than a sympathetic disaster relief program. The case of post-Katrina assistance practices illustrate that assistance programs created in a society where the conceptualization of the poor is based on controlling images of Black women make it more difficult for everyone in need to receive swift and adequate help. This underscores the interconnected nature of oppression and suggests that a better understanding of this interconnectivity is crucial to the project of dismantling inequality.

Justice for the LGBTQ Community: A Comparative Analysis of Six State Hate Crime Statutes (Kira Wilpone‐Jordan)

In recent years, while the aggregate number of hate crimes reported across the country dropped, the number of hate crimes reported against members of the LGBTQ community rose by six-percent. This increase in hate crimes against members of the LGBTQ community engenders the question: how do current laws protect members of the LGBTQ community who are victims of hate crimes? Current research on hate crimes focuses less on an assessment of the protections provided to LGBTQ victims of hate crimes and more on the effects hate crimes have on victims and targeted communities. Although this research is important in driving the acceptance and adoption of hate crimes legislation, the increase in hate crimes in the LGBTQ community demands an assessment and analysis of the actual protections provided under hate crime laws in order to judge whether the laws are effective in combating the damage hate crimes cause.

In order to assess the effectiveness of hate crime statutes from six states—California, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington—my analysis focuses primarily on the acts defined as hate crimes and the protected classes (sexual orientation and/or gender identity and expression) identified. This examination of the language and content of state hate crime statutes elucidates the statutory provisions that provide the most protections for the expanding number of LGBTQ victims of hate crimes (including civil remedy provisions and the inclusion of gender identity and expression as a protected class) and those provisions that provide limited protections (minimal definitions). The resulting comparison between the most protective statutes and the least protective statutes illuminates the gaps in protections provided to victims across the country and constructs the necessary framework—including five major statutory provisions—needed to create a comprehensive hate crime statute.

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Oct 17th, 10:30 AM Oct 17th, 12:00 PM

Session One: Panel 1 - The State, Dependency and Protection

Marsh Hall 101

Iranian Immigrant Women in Canada: “Economic Security Among Iranian Immigrant Lone Mothers in Vancouver” (Giti Eghbal Kalvir)

Immigrant population refers to populations that are largely foreign born and granted immigration status by the Canadian immigration authorities. The proportion of the BC, Canada immigrant population has increased rapidly due to the high inflow of immigrants in the last few years. Since 1993, BC has become the second most popular province of destination for Canadian immigrants. From one point of view, immigrants are those who have kept Canada growing and prospering. On the other hand, immigrants have dealt with different sensitive issues such as language barrier, work skills expectation, degraded education and of course poverty.

Iranian Immigrant single mothers face a host of structural barriers to economic independence and their full integration to Canadian society. The poverty situation of immigrant single mothers resulting from low employability have been the focus of recent studies bringing forth a host of issues that demands further analysis, discussion and debate. Having said that, this research will examine why immigrant single mothers - - most specifically Iranian immigrant single mothers - - face lower employment rates; are less likely to work on a full–year, full-time basis; and have fewer opportunities to work in occupations requiring a university degree. By illustrating how the situation is even more difficult for Iranian immigrant single mothers who have to combine work and parenting responsibilities amidst the myriad of other problems that result from their gender and marital status. Yet, in spite of all the challenges, like all other single mothers in this country, Iranian immigrant single mothers constitute a back-to-back representation of the challenges faced by women and of the barriers in the lives of immigrants.

This paper is seeking to analyze immigrant women and most specifically Iranian immigrant single mothers contributing factor to the prevalence of persistent poverty among women from visible minority groups. As part of the conclusion , this paper will detail why special attention should be focused on the needs of those most likely to be living in poverty such as Iranian immigrant single mother households. Developing and suggesting some strategies to confront systematic racism and sexism, creating safe area for immigrant women to talk about their needs and experience, social security, seeing through the lens of the individual needs, contribution and responsibility could be mentioned as some of the out come through out this research.

Race/Gender/Sexuality and Government Assistance: The Case of Hurricane Katrina (Megan Reid)

In this paper I address the relationship between the federal government and displaced survivors of Hurricane Katrina in the context of FEMA’s post-disaster housing assistance program. I examine the specific ways FEMA’s informal practices deterred people in need from obtaining assistance. Hurricane survivors were deterred from applying for or following through with FEMA assistance programs through three informal practices: making applicants wait an undisclosed amount of time for all aspects of the assistance, treating applicants in way they interpreted to be rude and inhumane, and giving out incorrect or contradictory information regarding what applicants were eligible for, what assistance money was to be spent on, and how long assistance would be distributed. I consider this in the context of the trend towards a neoliberal welfare state and its reliance on a gendered, raced, and sexualized construction of poverty for justification. Though disaster victims are usually considered to be the “deserving poor,” when disaster victims turned out to be largely members of groups considered to be undeserving, the government response was run more like a contemporary welfare program than a sympathetic disaster relief program. The case of post-Katrina assistance practices illustrate that assistance programs created in a society where the conceptualization of the poor is based on controlling images of Black women make it more difficult for everyone in need to receive swift and adequate help. This underscores the interconnected nature of oppression and suggests that a better understanding of this interconnectivity is crucial to the project of dismantling inequality.

Justice for the LGBTQ Community: A Comparative Analysis of Six State Hate Crime Statutes (Kira Wilpone‐Jordan)

In recent years, while the aggregate number of hate crimes reported across the country dropped, the number of hate crimes reported against members of the LGBTQ community rose by six-percent. This increase in hate crimes against members of the LGBTQ community engenders the question: how do current laws protect members of the LGBTQ community who are victims of hate crimes? Current research on hate crimes focuses less on an assessment of the protections provided to LGBTQ victims of hate crimes and more on the effects hate crimes have on victims and targeted communities. Although this research is important in driving the acceptance and adoption of hate crimes legislation, the increase in hate crimes in the LGBTQ community demands an assessment and analysis of the actual protections provided under hate crime laws in order to judge whether the laws are effective in combating the damage hate crimes cause.

In order to assess the effectiveness of hate crime statutes from six states—California, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington—my analysis focuses primarily on the acts defined as hate crimes and the protected classes (sexual orientation and/or gender identity and expression) identified. This examination of the language and content of state hate crime statutes elucidates the statutory provisions that provide the most protections for the expanding number of LGBTQ victims of hate crimes (including civil remedy provisions and the inclusion of gender identity and expression as a protected class) and those provisions that provide limited protections (minimal definitions). The resulting comparison between the most protective statutes and the least protective statutes illuminates the gaps in protections provided to victims across the country and constructs the necessary framework—including five major statutory provisions—needed to create a comprehensive hate crime statute.