•  
  •  
 

Submission Preparation Guidelines for International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities

This page contains information about how to format your submission. If you are submitting a research article, non-fiction article, or creative writing piece, use the downloadable templates in order to make sure that your submission is properly formatted. If you have trouble determining which guideline to use, please contact the Managing Editors for assistance.

The links below will take you to guidelines that are specific to your type of submission:

Other types of projects are also encouraged. Please contact the Managing Editors to discuss alternate forms of submission.

Research Article Guidelines (e.g. natural sciences, psychology, sociology, etc.)

The use of human subjects or animals for research purposes is regulated by the federal government and individual institutions. All authors of manuscripts in this journal describing research involving human subjects or animal experimentation should obtain approval from their Institutional Review Board (IRB) or Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), as appropriate, prior to manuscript submission. Authors of manuscripts that describe multisite research must obtain approval from each institution's IRB or IACUC, as appropriate. A statement of IRB or IACUC approval must be included in the Materials and Methods section. Documentation of IRB or IACUC status must be made available upon request.

  • Download research article template here
  • If human and/or animal subjects are used, a statement must be included to indicate institutional Internal Review Board (IRB) approval or Animal Use approval.
  • Graphics, tables, and figures should be able to be understood on their own and must:
    • Be of high resolution, at least 300 DPI (dots per inch)
    • Have neat, legible labels and captions
    • Be simple. Avoid forcing too much information into a single graphic.
  • If you will be submitting additional files to be displayed on the web page alongside the article (e.g. data sets, video clips, sound files, etc.), you can do so AFTER submitting your document. Once your document is submitted you will be directed to a page that has instructions (#2 under “What’s next?”) for how to go about doing this.

When submitting a research article, you will be asked for the following items separately:

Faculty Mentor (required)

Cover Letter (required)

Subject Area (required)

Title (required)

Short Title (optional)

Abstract (required, separate from the article body)

Keywords (optional)

Streaming Media (optional)

Submission File (article body) in one of the following formats: Microsoft Word, RTF, or PDF. Articles must be submitted without a title page, abstract, or page numbers. These will be provided by the system.

Acknowledgements (optional)
The following sections describe some of these items in more detail.

Suggested Reviewers (required)

a. Cover Letter (required)
Each submission must be sponsored by a full-time faculty member of the discipline represented by the work done. A letter from the mentor is required that certifies the work was done by the contributor while an undergraduate and that the faculty member is willing to be acknowledged as mentor and/or co-author. This letter should also include your name, the title of your submission and the contact information of the mentor.

b. Title (required, 25 words or less)

c. Short Title (optional, 65 characters or less)
This will be used in the header of the final published article.

d. Abstract (required, 250 words or less, separate from the article body)
The abstract must include sufficient information for readers to judge the nature and significance of the topic, the adequacy of the investigative strategy, the nature of the results, and the conclusions. An abstract is not an introduction; it summarizes the substantive results of the work.

e. Keywords (optional)
This is a list of up to seven words or short phrases that are central and specific to your research.

f. Acknowledgments (optional)
Use this section to give credit to funding sources as well as collaborators who made important contributions to the work but not at the level of being a co-author.

g. Submission File (article body, 3500 words or less unless prior approval given by editors)
Organize the body of the paper carefully. Use headings and subheadings to make the organization clear. All resources must be referenced.

Subdivide the body into sections to emphasize both content and clarity. The following describes sections that are common in many research papers. While these sections are common, they are not required.

  • Introduction
    The introduction provides the information needed to understand the rest of the paper. Make sure to establish the background for the project; define terms that may not be familiar to readers outside the field; present the objective(s) and question(s) the research addresses; summarize previous research and the current status of the topic; discuss the relevance and significance of the research; and describe the general methods and rationale used to explore the hypothesis.
  • Methods and Materials
    The purpose of this section is to make it possible for someone versed in your area to repeat your experiment and reproduce your results. This section includes the research design, description of the sample, data collection, procedure, and approach to analysis.
  • Results
    Present the key results of the project without interpreting their meaning. Do not present raw data; use text, tables and figures to summarize. If feasible, follow the organization of the Methods and Materials section to provide consistency for the readers.
  • Discussion/Conclusions
    Use this section to interpret the results of the project. Restate the major issues you discussed in the introduction and interpret them in light of the results. Beyond simply interpreting the results, consider how the results and conclusions of this study influenced the readers’ knowledge or understanding of the problem and how this research could be applied.

h. Suggested Reviewers (required)
3-5 potential reviewers must be suggested along with their contact information. These should be faculty members at Colleges and Universities outside of the home institutions of the authors.

{ top }

Non-fiction Article Guidelines (e.g. philosophy, history, languages, etc.)

  • Download non-fiction article template here
  • Graphics, tables, and figures should be able to be understood on their own and must:
    • Be of high resolution, at least 300 DPI (dots per inch)
    • Have neat, legible labels and captions
    • Be simple. Avoid forcing too much information into a single graphic.
  • If you will be submitting additional files to be displayed on the web page alongside the article (e.g. data sets, video clips, sound files, etc.), you can do so AFTER submitting your document. Once your document is submitted you will be directed to a page that has instructions (#2 under “What’s next?”) for how to go about doing this.

When submitting a non-fiction article, you will be asked for the following items separately:

Faculty Mentor (required)

Cover Letter (required)

Subject Area (required)

Title (required)

Short Title (optional)

Abstract (required, separate from the article body)

Keywords (optional)

Streaming Media (optional)

Submission File (article body) in one of the following formats: Microsoft Word, RTF, or PDF. Articles must be submitted without a title page, abstract, or page numbers. These will be provided by the system.

Acknowledgments (optional)
The following sections describe some of these items in more detail.

Suggested Reviewers (required)

a. Cover Letter (required)
Each submission must be sponsored by a full-time faculty member of the discipline represented by the work done. A letter from the mentor is required that certifies the work was done by the contributor while an undergraduate and that the faculty member is willing to be acknowledged as mentor and/or co-author. This letter should also include your name, the title of your submission and the contact information of the mentor.

b. Title (required, 25 words or less)

c. Short Title (optional, 65 characters or less)
This will be used in the header of the final published article.

d. Abstract (required, 250 words or less, separate from the article body)
The abstract must include sufficient information for readers to judge the nature and significance of the topic, the adequacy of the investigative strategy, the nature of the results, and the conclusions. An abstract is not an introduction; it summarizes the substantive results of the work.

e. Keywords (optional)
This is a list of up to seven words or short phrases that are central and specific to your research.

f. Acknowledgments (optional)
Use this section to give credit to funding sources as well as collaborators who made important contributions to the work but not at the level of being a co-author.

g. Submission File (article body, 3500 words or less unless prior approval given by editors)
Focus your analysis around a central theme. Discuss how any facts you describe relate to the overall central theme of your paper. Every claim must be supported by citations, evidence, or thorough logical argument.

h. Suggested Reviewers (required)
3-5 potential reviewers must be suggested along with their contact information. These should be faculty members at Colleges and Universities outside of the home institutions of the authors.

{ top }

Creative Writing Piece Guidelines (e.g. fiction, poetry, etc.)

  • Download creative writing piece template here
  • Any graphics (optional) should be able to be understood on their own and must:
    • Be of high resolution, at least 300 DPI (dots per inch)
    • Have neat, legible labels and captions
  • If you will be submitting additional files to be displayed on the web page alongside the article (e.g. data sets, video clips, sound files, etc.), you can do so AFTER submitting your document. Once your document is submitted you will be directed to a page that has instructions (#2 under “What’s next?”) for how to go about doing this.

Fiction:
Works of fiction should have literary depth. The story should be engaging with well- developed characters and plot.

Poetry:
Submissions in this category can be in any form (i.e. free verse, sonnets, etc.). Submissions should have good imagery and metaphor.

When submitting a creative writing piece, you will be asked for the following items separately:

Faculty Mentor (required)

Cover Letter (required)

Subject Area (required)

Title (required)

Short Title (optional)

Abstract (required, separate from the manuscript body)

Keywords (optional)

Streaming Media (optional)

Submission File (article body) in one of the following formats: Microsoft Word, RTF, or PDF. Manuscripts must be submitted without a title page, abstract, or page numbers. These will be provided by the system.

Acknowledgements (optional)
The following sections describe some of these items in more detail.

Suggested Reviewers (required)

a. Cover Letter (required)

Each submission must be sponsored by a full-time faculty member of the discipline represented by the work done. A letter from the mentor is required that certifies the work was done by the contributor while an undergraduate and that the faculty member is willing to be acknowledged as mentor and/or co-author. This letter should also include your name, the title of your submission and the contact information of the mentor.

b. Title (required, 25 words or less)

c. Short Title (optional, 65 characters or less)
This will be used in the header of the final published manuscript.

d. Abstract (required, 250 words or less, separate from the article body)
The abstract serves as an introduction to the manuscript. It should describe the genre (if applicable) and provide a brief synopsis of the work.

e. Keywords (optional)
This is a list of up to seven words or short phrases that are central and specific to your manuscript.

f. Acknowledgments (optional)
Use this section to give credit to funding sources as well as collaborators who made important contributions to the work but not at the level of being a co-author.

g. Submission File (article body, 3500 words or less unless prior approval given by editors)
Contains the manuscript body.

h. Suggested Reviewers (required)
3-5 potential reviewers must be suggested along with their contact information. These should be faculty members at Colleges and Universities outside of the home institutions of the authors.

{ top }

Photography and Artwork Guidelines

If you will be submitting multiple photographs, you will need to first submit a SINGLE photograph. Once that is submitted, you will be directed to a page that has instructions (#2 under “What’s next?”) for how to go about submitting additional files (photographs, video clips, sound files, etc.).

When submitting photography or artwork, you will be asked for the following items separately:

Faculty Mentor (required)

Cover Letter (required)

Subject Area (required)

Title (required)

Short Title (optional)

Abstract (required)

Keywords (optional)

Streaming Media (optional)

Submission File (required)

Acknowledgements (optional)
The following sections describe some of these items in more detail.

Suggested Reviewers (required)

a. Cover Letter (required)
Each submission must be sponsored by a full-time faculty member of the discipline represented by the work done. A letter from the mentor is required that certifies the work was done by the contributor while an undergraduate and that the faculty member is willing to be acknowledged as mentor and/or co-author. This letter should also include your name, the title of your submission and the contact information of the mentor.

b. Title (required, 25 words or less)

c. Short Title (optional, 65 characters or less)
This will be used in the header of the final published article.

d. Abstract (required, 250 words or less, separate from the article body)
The abstract must include sufficient information for readers to judge the nature and significance of the topic, the adequacy of the investigative strategy, the nature of the results, and the conclusions. An abstract is not an introduction; it summarizes the substantive results of the work.

e. Keywords (optional)
This is a list of up to seven words or short phrases that are central and specific to your research.

f. Acknowledgments (optional)
Use this section to give credit to funding sources as well as collaborators who made important contributions to the work but not at the level of being a co-author.

g. Submission File
Art submissions must be submitted as JPEG images of 300 dpi.

h. Suggested Reviewers (required)
3-5 potential reviewers must be suggested along with their contact information. These should be faculty members at Colleges and Universities outside of the home institutions of the authors.

{ top }

Video Guidelines

If you will be submitting additional files to be displayed on the web page alongside the video (e.g. photographs, other supporting documents, etc.), you can do so AFTER submitting your video. Once that is submitted, you will be directed to a page that has instructions (#2 under “What’s next?”) for how to go about submitting additional files.

When submitting a creative work in video format, you will be asked for the following items separately:

Faculty Mentor (required)

Cover Letter (required)

Subject Area (required)

Title (required)

Short Title (optional)

Abstract (required, separate from the article body)

Keywords (optional)

Streaming Media (optional)

Submission File (not necessary)

Acknowledgments (optional)
The following sections describe some of these items in more detail.

Suggested Reviewers (required)

a. Cover Letter (required)
Each submission must be sponsored by a full-time faculty member of the discipline represented by the work done. A letter from the mentor is required that certifies the work was done by the contributor while an undergraduate and that the faculty member is willing to be acknowledged as mentor and/or co-author. This letter should also include your name, the title of your submission and the contact information of the mentor.

b. Title (required, 25 words or less)

c. Short Title (optional, 65 characters or less)
This will be used in the header of the final published video.

d. Abstract (required, 250 words or less, separate from the article body)
The abstract serves as an introduction to the video. It should describe the genre (if applicable), duration, and provide a brief synopsis of the work.

e. Keywords (optional)
This is a list of up to seven words or short phrases that are central and specific to your research.

f. Acknowledgments (optional)
Use this section to give credit to funding sources as well as collaborators who made important contributions to the work but not at the level of being a co-author.

g. Streaming Media
Video files should be hosted on an existing web server or video hosting service (YouTube is preferred), and should have no access restrictions (i.e. no log-in or password required). If a privately managed server is used to host video files, it is vital that the URI (web address) of the file not be subject to change over time. Video files should be saved in a common and cross-platform file format such as (MPEG, FLV, H.264, and WMV). Using a web video hosting service will eliminate any file format issues as files are converted to common formats when uploaded.

Video that will be displayed on the web carries with it certain bandwidth requirements in order for it to be seen without long pauses. This is known as the video's data rate, which is the average number of bits that must be transmitted in a given amount of time to allow for uninterrupted playback. Data rate is determined by myriad variables in the video's presentation (aspect ratio, dimensions, frame rate, codec, etc.). To allow for the widest possible viewership of all video files in PNWJURCA, data rates should be less than 500 kbps (total data rate, not just the video track). All video editing and conversion utilities have the controls to set this. See your software's documentation for more information.

h. Suggested Reviewers (required)
3-5 potential reviewers must be suggested along with their contact information. These should be faculty members at Colleges and Universities outside of the home institutions of the authors.

{ top }