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Date of Award

2016

Degree Type

Dissertation (On-Campus Access Only)

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Committee Chair

Paul G. Michael, PhD

Second Advisor

Jon Frew, PhD, ABPP

Abstract

The impact of climate change has had broad implications for individuals and organizations. As organizations adjust their policies and practices to incorporate proenvironmental agendas, members of the organizations must consider their goals and values in the ever-growing job market. The present study sought to understand better how organizational, and individual proenvironmental values and goals may predict job-related outcomes. A survey of 41 participants working in “environmentally friendly” organizations assessed person-organization fit (PO fit), person-job fit (PJ fit), organizational environmental goals and values, and individual environmental attitudes as well as three outcome variables including job satisfaction, intention to quit and organizational commitment. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was utilized to identify relevant variables that may predict job satisfaction, intention to quit, and organizational commitment. Several covariates including gender, age, and tenure were controlled for the in the regression analysis. Three separate hierarchical multiple regressions included, PO fit, PJ fit, organizational environmental goals and values, and individual environmental attitudes were used to predict job satisfaction, intention to quit and organizational commitment. The results indicated that the covariates (i.e., tenure, age, gender) were not significant predictors in any of the models and PO and PJ fit were the best predictors of the outcome variables. Conclusions were discussed including future directions and limitations of the study.

Available for download on Saturday, September 08, 2018

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