Date of Award

7-26-2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Clinical Psychology (MSCP)

Committee Chair

Genevieve L. Y. Arnaut, Psy.D., Ph.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate attitude differences between violent and nonviolent offenders. A random sample of 136 male prisoners in Oregon completed the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale, the 16-item Social Dominance Orientation scale, and the Multiple Stimulus Tolerance for Ambiguity scale to assess authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and tolerance for ambiguity, respectively. The Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Form C, was also included as a validity measure. Results indicated no significant differences between violent and nonviolent offenders on the three attitude measures. However, violent offenders scored significantly higher than nonviolent offenders on the social-desirability measure, suggesting that the lack of significant findings may reflect a desire to respond in a socially desirable way.

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Library Use: LIH

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