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Date of Award

7-19-2005

Degree Type

Dissertation (On-Campus Access Only)

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Committee Chair

Paula E. Truax, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Jennifer Antick, Ph.D.

Abstract

In 1995, 32,649 suicides occurred in the U.S. (National Center for Health Statistics, 1996). Each suicide death leaves behind 6 to 10 people who are severely affected by it. This results in the creation of 180,000 to 300,000 new survivors in this country each year (Clark, 2001). There are several factors that make grief resulting from a suicide death particularly complicated. There has been very little research conducted on interventions for suicide survivors who seek mental health treatment. This correlational study surveyed 34 adult suicide survivors, to determine what has been most helpful to them in their grieving process. The results of the survey, combined with existing research in this area, were used to recommend preferred methods of treatment for this often underserved population.

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