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Date of Award

4-20-2007

Degree Type

Thesis (On-Campus Access Only)

Degree Name

Master of Science in Clinical Psychology (MSCP)

Committee Chair

Victor Savicki, PhD

Second Advisor

Jon Frew, PhD, ABPP

Abstract

This study examined the hypotheses that high levels of pre-decision agreement would negatively affect group performance and that group development activities would moderate this relationship. Ninety two 3-person groups from a university in the Pacific Northwest participated in the study (Mean age 20.71 years). Eighty-eight percent were Caucasian, 70% female, 30% male. Two survival tasks were given individually and as a group with pre-decision agreement measured using Kendall's W. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed no main effects for pre-decision agreement, nor for group development activities of Forming, and Feedback. A significant interaction was found for Feedback and Pre-Decision Agreement. Providing performance feedback moderated the negative effect of high levels of pre-decision agreement on group performance.

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