Title

The Intersections of Developmental Theory and Occupational Science

Start Time

15-11-2002 1:15 PM

End Time

15-11-2002 2:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical intersections between occupational science and developmental theory. The discussion of developmental theory will be situated in contemporary conceptual frames based on life span processes and sociocultural and historical analysis (e.g., Elder, 1998). Recent work in developmental theory has focused on the need to understand how "real people" lead "real lives" (Mishler, 1996) in naturalistic settings (Weisner, 1996). There has been a rather abrupt turn away from hierachical and stage driven theories towards models of change that capture sociocultural mediation of human experience. This new appreciation of processes foregrounds the contributions of human sociality and cultural resources to learning, identity formation, and creation of possible futures. Arguments related to the relatedness of developmental theory and occupational science will be presented. Specific dimensions to be explored include occupation and social practices; engagement; identity formation and self-making practices; change and transformation; living and learning in everyday life; and "meaning." Longitudinal ethnographic data collected over a six year period will be presented to illustrate analytic possibilities from both occupational science and developmental theory perspectives. The analysis will also feature the temporal dimensions of analytic units with illustrations based on ethnographic examples of "moments" and "Jives". Implications for theory development and research in occupational science will be discussed.

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Nov 15th, 1:15 PM Nov 15th, 2:30 PM

The Intersections of Developmental Theory and Occupational Science

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical intersections between occupational science and developmental theory. The discussion of developmental theory will be situated in contemporary conceptual frames based on life span processes and sociocultural and historical analysis (e.g., Elder, 1998). Recent work in developmental theory has focused on the need to understand how "real people" lead "real lives" (Mishler, 1996) in naturalistic settings (Weisner, 1996). There has been a rather abrupt turn away from hierachical and stage driven theories towards models of change that capture sociocultural mediation of human experience. This new appreciation of processes foregrounds the contributions of human sociality and cultural resources to learning, identity formation, and creation of possible futures. Arguments related to the relatedness of developmental theory and occupational science will be presented. Specific dimensions to be explored include occupation and social practices; engagement; identity formation and self-making practices; change and transformation; living and learning in everyday life; and "meaning." Longitudinal ethnographic data collected over a six year period will be presented to illustrate analytic possibilities from both occupational science and developmental theory perspectives. The analysis will also feature the temporal dimensions of analytic units with illustrations based on ethnographic examples of "moments" and "Jives". Implications for theory development and research in occupational science will be discussed.