Title

Occupational Balance and Occupational Coaching

Start Time

16-11-2002 3:30 PM

End Time

16-11-2002 4:45 PM

Abstract

Life in this modern world is busy and full of obligations to employer, family and community. In an effort to meet unending obligations, one's need for finding "occupational balance" through meaningful activities is often overlooked resulting in burn-out, stress and poor health. The emerging role of OT in prevention and wellness is a natural fit for the many individuals who are "occupationally deprived" and "unbalanced." Individuals who are considered medically well because there are no apparent diseases or impairments, may consider their lives unhappy, unfulfilling or empty as a result of dissatisfaction in their lifestyles. Johl)son (1986) defines wellness as a context for living; a process rather than a particular state of being; where there is a balance between the body, self and environmental dimensions; where life has meaning, and where behaviors contribute to the well being of others. In other words, what we do from day to day, (or our occupations) defines our lifestyle or occupational balance and significantly impacts our health and well-being. We will be describing research that supports these relationships and how it can impact occupational therapy practice. Occupational coaching is an emerging role for occupational therapists wanting to help individuals or groups find balance in their lives. An important first step in coaching clients wanting to make lifestyle changes is to thoughtfully critique current occupational choices, habits, and patterns. We will describe the Occupational Balance Inventory, an assessment designed to begin this self-critique and other assessments of occupational patterns and habits. These assessments lead the goal setting process and provide needed information for direct actions for lifestyle changes. Occupational coaching is based on the principle that individuals are capable of assessing, changing, or adapting the occupational choices and patterns in their lifestyle even though personal and environmental contexts may or may not change. The "doing" of occupation is uniquely individual because of the meaning and context of the experience, yet occupations can be seen and labeled by people because of the visible, concrete actions, and distinct patterns or habits characteristic of them. Consequently, they can be studied, self-assessed, adapted, or modified easier than other important influences in human experiences such as one's feelings or thoughts. Thinking and feeling are internal processes, acting is external and produces results. The way one thinks or feels effects chosen occupations and conversely, the occupations chosen will affect how one thinks or feels. Recognizing the dynamic interplay of thoughts, feelings and actions in a healthy life style is important, yet it is the doing of occupation that brings change in our lives. Therefore, an occupational coach can help guide individuals' balance of meaningful occupations influencing overall health and well-being.

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Nov 16th, 3:30 PM Nov 16th, 4:45 PM

Occupational Balance and Occupational Coaching

Life in this modern world is busy and full of obligations to employer, family and community. In an effort to meet unending obligations, one's need for finding "occupational balance" through meaningful activities is often overlooked resulting in burn-out, stress and poor health. The emerging role of OT in prevention and wellness is a natural fit for the many individuals who are "occupationally deprived" and "unbalanced." Individuals who are considered medically well because there are no apparent diseases or impairments, may consider their lives unhappy, unfulfilling or empty as a result of dissatisfaction in their lifestyles. Johl)son (1986) defines wellness as a context for living; a process rather than a particular state of being; where there is a balance between the body, self and environmental dimensions; where life has meaning, and where behaviors contribute to the well being of others. In other words, what we do from day to day, (or our occupations) defines our lifestyle or occupational balance and significantly impacts our health and well-being. We will be describing research that supports these relationships and how it can impact occupational therapy practice. Occupational coaching is an emerging role for occupational therapists wanting to help individuals or groups find balance in their lives. An important first step in coaching clients wanting to make lifestyle changes is to thoughtfully critique current occupational choices, habits, and patterns. We will describe the Occupational Balance Inventory, an assessment designed to begin this self-critique and other assessments of occupational patterns and habits. These assessments lead the goal setting process and provide needed information for direct actions for lifestyle changes. Occupational coaching is based on the principle that individuals are capable of assessing, changing, or adapting the occupational choices and patterns in their lifestyle even though personal and environmental contexts may or may not change. The "doing" of occupation is uniquely individual because of the meaning and context of the experience, yet occupations can be seen and labeled by people because of the visible, concrete actions, and distinct patterns or habits characteristic of them. Consequently, they can be studied, self-assessed, adapted, or modified easier than other important influences in human experiences such as one's feelings or thoughts. Thinking and feeling are internal processes, acting is external and produces results. The way one thinks or feels effects chosen occupations and conversely, the occupations chosen will affect how one thinks or feels. Recognizing the dynamic interplay of thoughts, feelings and actions in a healthy life style is important, yet it is the doing of occupation that brings change in our lives. Therefore, an occupational coach can help guide individuals' balance of meaningful occupations influencing overall health and well-being.