Title

Family Identity and Family Occupations

Presenter Information

Ruth Segal, New York University

Start Time

15-11-2002 3:00 PM

End Time

15-11-2002 4:15 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss work in progress on the interactions of family identity and family daily life as acted out in the construction of occupations, routines and schedules. Family identity is the family's subjective sense of its own continuity over time, its present situation and its character. Family identity evolves over time while maintaining its coherence while new occupations are added and old ones discontinued. This family identity is behind family policies that direct the constructions of family occupations, routines and schedules. Family identity, on the other hand, is embedded in the ritualization and continual narration of family occupations, routines and schedules from the past of the current and historical families. The sense of continuity over time with the historical families in particular may be challenged for families raising children with special needs because the actual daily life may not follow policies that were constructed on past experiences. The adaptations of the family daily life, however, provide the material to be narrated and ritualized into the evolving family identity.

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Nov 15th, 3:00 PM Nov 15th, 4:15 PM

Family Identity and Family Occupations

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss work in progress on the interactions of family identity and family daily life as acted out in the construction of occupations, routines and schedules. Family identity is the family's subjective sense of its own continuity over time, its present situation and its character. Family identity evolves over time while maintaining its coherence while new occupations are added and old ones discontinued. This family identity is behind family policies that direct the constructions of family occupations, routines and schedules. Family identity, on the other hand, is embedded in the ritualization and continual narration of family occupations, routines and schedules from the past of the current and historical families. The sense of continuity over time with the historical families in particular may be challenged for families raising children with special needs because the actual daily life may not follow policies that were constructed on past experiences. The adaptations of the family daily life, however, provide the material to be narrated and ritualized into the evolving family identity.