Title

The Potential for Deweyan Philosophy and Geographical Thought in the Occupational Science

Start Time

16-11-2002 8:15 AM

End Time

16-11-2002 9:45 AM

Abstract

In this paper I present an analysis of two disparate but important realms of thought for occupational science. After an introductory rationale for the argument, I provide a synopsis of selected aspects of John Dewey's philosophy. This part of the paper puts Dewey's concepts in context by introducing him and his life's work. I then turn to Dewey's conception of experience the focal point of his philosophy and its corollaries of situation, habit, intelligence, activity, and morality. Moreover, I articulate these concepts and their relationships with particular attention to their meaning for occupational science. A second part of the paper shifts to geographical thought and to the concept of place in particular. Here I present a brief review of the various uses and meanings of place and their role in human life. I expand upon the typical geographical usage of place to make connections between this primary concept in geography and occupational science. In a third and final part of the paper I introduce the concept of place integration, a theoretical construct that synthesizes a Deweyan perspective with a geographical emphasis on and understanding of place. In addition to explaining the concept and how I have used it in different research projects, I suggest ways in which place integration and other aspects of Dewey's philosophy and geographical thought can be of use in occupational science. I pay particular attention to occupational therapists' and occupational scientists' work on pragmatism, such as Breines, and Hooper and Wood, as well as geographers such as Rowles, who write about occupation. My summary goal is to begin extending these efforts toward a more in-depth and meaningful scholarly relationship between Deweyan philosophy, geographical thought, and occupational science

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Nov 16th, 8:15 AM Nov 16th, 9:45 AM

The Potential for Deweyan Philosophy and Geographical Thought in the Occupational Science

In this paper I present an analysis of two disparate but important realms of thought for occupational science. After an introductory rationale for the argument, I provide a synopsis of selected aspects of John Dewey's philosophy. This part of the paper puts Dewey's concepts in context by introducing him and his life's work. I then turn to Dewey's conception of experience the focal point of his philosophy and its corollaries of situation, habit, intelligence, activity, and morality. Moreover, I articulate these concepts and their relationships with particular attention to their meaning for occupational science. A second part of the paper shifts to geographical thought and to the concept of place in particular. Here I present a brief review of the various uses and meanings of place and their role in human life. I expand upon the typical geographical usage of place to make connections between this primary concept in geography and occupational science. In a third and final part of the paper I introduce the concept of place integration, a theoretical construct that synthesizes a Deweyan perspective with a geographical emphasis on and understanding of place. In addition to explaining the concept and how I have used it in different research projects, I suggest ways in which place integration and other aspects of Dewey's philosophy and geographical thought can be of use in occupational science. I pay particular attention to occupational therapists' and occupational scientists' work on pragmatism, such as Breines, and Hooper and Wood, as well as geographers such as Rowles, who write about occupation. My summary goal is to begin extending these efforts toward a more in-depth and meaningful scholarly relationship between Deweyan philosophy, geographical thought, and occupational science