Title

Children Helping Out at Home: A Measure of School-Age Children's Participation in Household Activities

Presenter Information

Louise Dunn, Boston University

Start Time

15-11-2002 10:30 AM

End Time

15-11-2002 11:45 AM

Abstract

Families play a major role in preparing their children for future adult roles, particularly for household occupations. Much of this preparation occurs through guided participation in household activities with gradual transfer of responsibility from adult to child. However, in the United States, families vary greatly in their home routines and in the values that guide their decisions and expectations for their children's participation. We lack measures to assess how families prepare their school-aged children for household occupations, especially families who have school-aged children with disabilities. Children Helping Out at Home (CHOH) is a measure designed to examine changes in roles and responsibility in household occupations for school-aged children. The content for CHOH evolved from a review of descriptive research on participation of school-aged children in household activities and cross-cultural research on developmental expectations. CHOH examines participation of school-aged children in individual and family household activities. Changes in roles and responsibilities for children are measured by caregivers' ratings of the degree of assistance their children may require to perform household activities. Four focus groups of caregivers from diverse cultural backgrounds who have school-aged children with and without disabilities provided feedback for the revision of the CHOH. Support for content validity of the CHOH came from agreement of the focus group members that the CHOH represented the range of household activities in their homes. The revised CHOH includes items that examine caregivers' reasons, strategies, future expectations, and satisfaction with their children's participation in household activities. Preliminary studies are underway to examine internal consistency and test-retest reliability for the CHOH. With further study, the CHOH will prove helpful for understanding more about how families prepare their school-aged children with and without disabilities for adult roles.

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Nov 15th, 10:30 AM Nov 15th, 11:45 AM

Children Helping Out at Home: A Measure of School-Age Children's Participation in Household Activities

Families play a major role in preparing their children for future adult roles, particularly for household occupations. Much of this preparation occurs through guided participation in household activities with gradual transfer of responsibility from adult to child. However, in the United States, families vary greatly in their home routines and in the values that guide their decisions and expectations for their children's participation. We lack measures to assess how families prepare their school-aged children for household occupations, especially families who have school-aged children with disabilities. Children Helping Out at Home (CHOH) is a measure designed to examine changes in roles and responsibility in household occupations for school-aged children. The content for CHOH evolved from a review of descriptive research on participation of school-aged children in household activities and cross-cultural research on developmental expectations. CHOH examines participation of school-aged children in individual and family household activities. Changes in roles and responsibilities for children are measured by caregivers' ratings of the degree of assistance their children may require to perform household activities. Four focus groups of caregivers from diverse cultural backgrounds who have school-aged children with and without disabilities provided feedback for the revision of the CHOH. Support for content validity of the CHOH came from agreement of the focus group members that the CHOH represented the range of household activities in their homes. The revised CHOH includes items that examine caregivers' reasons, strategies, future expectations, and satisfaction with their children's participation in household activities. Preliminary studies are underway to examine internal consistency and test-retest reliability for the CHOH. With further study, the CHOH will prove helpful for understanding more about how families prepare their school-aged children with and without disabilities for adult roles.