Title

Gender Differences in Occupational Performance After Cardiac Events

Start Time

16-11-2002 3:30 PM

End Time

16-11-2002 4:45 PM

Abstract

The goal of this study currently in progress is to examine occupational performance in men and women following recovery from myocardial infarction (MI) and/or coronary bypass surgery (CABS). Previous studies by Artinian and Duggan (1995) and Sauvre and Fortin (1996) examined differences between men and women in recovery patterns and return to work, and found that women had slower recovery rates and returned to work more slowly than men. However, they also found that women returned to their roles around the home more quickly than employment roles. Engblom and associates (1997) found that cardiac rehabilitation programs were motivating and improved psychological status for patients, but Sauvre and Fortin (1996) felt women had more psychosocial problems in recovery than men. On the other hand, Shaffer and Corish (1998) found that women who participated in cardiac rehabilitation programs had the same or greater functional gains than men. Didion (personal communication, 2000) reports that while the numbers of women treated for Ml or receiving CABS at her institution has increased over the past 20 years, the percentage of woman versus men participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs has remained stable. Further, despite research reports of differences in recovery patterns, she also reports that cardiac rehabilitation programs have not become gender specific. There is a need for further research to investigate changes in occupational performance, if any, following Ml and/or CABS, and to determine if such performance patterns are different for men and women. This information will be broader than "return to work" and will encompass more issues related to quality of life. The data thus collected may be useful in designing rehabilitation programs which are more individualized and inclusive for women and more effective for both genders. The methods used will include a demographic survey and the SPF-36, which is a self-reporting questionnaire about daily living activities and quality of life. This study has been approved by both the Internal Review Boards of the participating educational institution and the Park Nicollet Clinic: the cardiologist in charge of the Park Nicollet Clinic has also agreed to distribute the survey and SPF-36 through his office. Data will be collected during the summer of 2002 by two graduate students and will be analyzed using the computerized SPF-36 which is available on-line. Results will be available in time to be presented at the Occupational Science conference.

Comments

This abstract/proposal was accepted into the conference, but was not presented.

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Nov 16th, 3:30 PM Nov 16th, 4:45 PM

Gender Differences in Occupational Performance After Cardiac Events

The goal of this study currently in progress is to examine occupational performance in men and women following recovery from myocardial infarction (MI) and/or coronary bypass surgery (CABS). Previous studies by Artinian and Duggan (1995) and Sauvre and Fortin (1996) examined differences between men and women in recovery patterns and return to work, and found that women had slower recovery rates and returned to work more slowly than men. However, they also found that women returned to their roles around the home more quickly than employment roles. Engblom and associates (1997) found that cardiac rehabilitation programs were motivating and improved psychological status for patients, but Sauvre and Fortin (1996) felt women had more psychosocial problems in recovery than men. On the other hand, Shaffer and Corish (1998) found that women who participated in cardiac rehabilitation programs had the same or greater functional gains than men. Didion (personal communication, 2000) reports that while the numbers of women treated for Ml or receiving CABS at her institution has increased over the past 20 years, the percentage of woman versus men participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs has remained stable. Further, despite research reports of differences in recovery patterns, she also reports that cardiac rehabilitation programs have not become gender specific. There is a need for further research to investigate changes in occupational performance, if any, following Ml and/or CABS, and to determine if such performance patterns are different for men and women. This information will be broader than "return to work" and will encompass more issues related to quality of life. The data thus collected may be useful in designing rehabilitation programs which are more individualized and inclusive for women and more effective for both genders. The methods used will include a demographic survey and the SPF-36, which is a self-reporting questionnaire about daily living activities and quality of life. This study has been approved by both the Internal Review Boards of the participating educational institution and the Park Nicollet Clinic: the cardiologist in charge of the Park Nicollet Clinic has also agreed to distribute the survey and SPF-36 through his office. Data will be collected during the summer of 2002 by two graduate students and will be analyzed using the computerized SPF-36 which is available on-line. Results will be available in time to be presented at the Occupational Science conference.