Title

Science in the History of Occupational Therapy

Start Time

15-11-2002 1:15 PM

End Time

15-11-2002 2:30 PM

Abstract

The history of occupational therapy has been characterized by a variety of cultural movements, from the Arts and Crafts Movement, to moral treatment, and the Emmanuel Movement. What has been largely ignored is one of the most powerful elements of culture in the twentieth century: Science. In this presentation I will demonstrate how, in the quest for professional status, the fledgling profession of occupational therapy incorporated the scientific rhetoric of the time, particularly from medical science and psychiatry in particular, in order to provide a scientific foundation for the practice of occupational therapy. Psychotherapy was a new arena in the practice of medicine, and the genesis of psychotherapy and occupational therapy are closely related. Ultimately, in the quest for professionalism, occupational therapy allied itself with the scientific theory of the time that supported its practice. This presentation will focus on the changes that took place in the shift from moral treatment to the new practice of occupational therapy, and the scientific theory that fueled the new profession during the first forty years of the twentieth century. I believe that this research provides valuable insight into the rationale and the science of occupation that was integral to the profession from the beginning of the twentieth century.

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Nov 15th, 1:15 PM Nov 15th, 2:30 PM

Science in the History of Occupational Therapy

The history of occupational therapy has been characterized by a variety of cultural movements, from the Arts and Crafts Movement, to moral treatment, and the Emmanuel Movement. What has been largely ignored is one of the most powerful elements of culture in the twentieth century: Science. In this presentation I will demonstrate how, in the quest for professional status, the fledgling profession of occupational therapy incorporated the scientific rhetoric of the time, particularly from medical science and psychiatry in particular, in order to provide a scientific foundation for the practice of occupational therapy. Psychotherapy was a new arena in the practice of medicine, and the genesis of psychotherapy and occupational therapy are closely related. Ultimately, in the quest for professionalism, occupational therapy allied itself with the scientific theory of the time that supported its practice. This presentation will focus on the changes that took place in the shift from moral treatment to the new practice of occupational therapy, and the scientific theory that fueled the new profession during the first forty years of the twentieth century. I believe that this research provides valuable insight into the rationale and the science of occupation that was integral to the profession from the beginning of the twentieth century.