Title

Mind-Body Interaction in Occupation

Presenter Information

Bonnie Kennedy

Start Time

16-10-2002 12:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2002 12:00 AM

Abstract

Occupational science has been concerned with the subjective experience of occupation since its inception. The experiences of Flow and pleasure in occupation have been specifically sited as variables of interest in Occupational Science literature. Holism is an assumption of occupational science, yet few data-based studies exist in this discipline to directly support the paradigm. To address this need, two studies were initiated to demonstrate mind-body interaction in the context of daily occupation in the natural environment of women with HIV.

Opportunistic infections of oral mucosal membranes are a threat to persons with compromised immune systems. One mechanism the body uses to prevent pathogens from taking hold in oral mucosa is the presence of immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) in saliva. Stress has been observed to reduce the availability of (S-IgA) in laboratory studies, while positive experiences have been observed to increase its availability. Fortunately, most ordinary daily occupation does not occur in the laboratory, therefore this mind-body interaction must be tested in the natural environment. The research questions addressed in this presentation will be: Is there a higher concentration of salivary immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) during occupations experienced as highly pleasurable? And Is there a higher concentration of S-IgA during Flow than non-Flow states?

Using the experience sampling method women with HIV reported the subjective experience of their daily occupations in real-time and collected an on-the-spot saliva sample 6 times per day for one week. To compare highly pleasurable occupations to occupations that were experienced with lower than average pleasure, self- reported raw scores on a Likert scale were transformed into z-scores for each woman separately and occupations with a z-score of greater than zero were compared to occupations rated less than zero. The concentration of SIgA was found to be statistically significantly greater during highly pleasurable occupations. Data analysis on the second research question is in progress. The first study suggests support for the holistic paradigm of mind-body interaction in daily occupation in the natural environment. It also suggests that there are design elements available in the subjective experience of occupation that can be used to support the health of persons with compromised immune systems.

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Oct 16th, 12:00 AM Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

Mind-Body Interaction in Occupation

Occupational science has been concerned with the subjective experience of occupation since its inception. The experiences of Flow and pleasure in occupation have been specifically sited as variables of interest in Occupational Science literature. Holism is an assumption of occupational science, yet few data-based studies exist in this discipline to directly support the paradigm. To address this need, two studies were initiated to demonstrate mind-body interaction in the context of daily occupation in the natural environment of women with HIV.

Opportunistic infections of oral mucosal membranes are a threat to persons with compromised immune systems. One mechanism the body uses to prevent pathogens from taking hold in oral mucosa is the presence of immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) in saliva. Stress has been observed to reduce the availability of (S-IgA) in laboratory studies, while positive experiences have been observed to increase its availability. Fortunately, most ordinary daily occupation does not occur in the laboratory, therefore this mind-body interaction must be tested in the natural environment. The research questions addressed in this presentation will be: Is there a higher concentration of salivary immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) during occupations experienced as highly pleasurable? And Is there a higher concentration of S-IgA during Flow than non-Flow states?

Using the experience sampling method women with HIV reported the subjective experience of their daily occupations in real-time and collected an on-the-spot saliva sample 6 times per day for one week. To compare highly pleasurable occupations to occupations that were experienced with lower than average pleasure, self- reported raw scores on a Likert scale were transformed into z-scores for each woman separately and occupations with a z-score of greater than zero were compared to occupations rated less than zero. The concentration of SIgA was found to be statistically significantly greater during highly pleasurable occupations. Data analysis on the second research question is in progress. The first study suggests support for the holistic paradigm of mind-body interaction in daily occupation in the natural environment. It also suggests that there are design elements available in the subjective experience of occupation that can be used to support the health of persons with compromised immune systems.