Title

The Occupational Nature of Chronic Illness: Experiences of Men Living with HIV

Presenter Information

Matthew Molineux

Start Time

16-10-2002 12:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2002 12:00 AM

Abstract

Since the discovery of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) much research has been undertaken to explore the impact of infection with HIV. Much of this research has come from fields such as nursing, psychology, and sociology. Closer scrutiny of that literature reveals that HIV infection has very clear occupational implications which include for example the cessation of engagement in occupations and the development of new configurations of occupations. On reviewing the occupational therapy and occupational science literature it is surprising that apart from a small number of notable exceptions, little research has explored the occupational nature of living with HIV infection.

This paper will present an overview of research which employed qualitative methods to explore the occupational nature of living with HIV. Oral histories were elicited from five men infected with HIV living in the UK. These oral histories were in-depth stories about each man's life from birth until the time of the last interview and ranged in duration from 4 to 16 hours of recorded material. The oral histories were each analysed individually using narrative methods, to produce a story that highlighted the occupational nature of living with HIV for each man. These stories provide a valuable insight into how each man came to live with HIV in the context of his occupational history. From the stories it is possible to begin to understand how living with a chronic illness, such as HIV infection, impacts on occupational engagement.

Comments

Specific date/time of presentation not currently reflected here.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 16th, 12:00 AM Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

The Occupational Nature of Chronic Illness: Experiences of Men Living with HIV

Since the discovery of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) much research has been undertaken to explore the impact of infection with HIV. Much of this research has come from fields such as nursing, psychology, and sociology. Closer scrutiny of that literature reveals that HIV infection has very clear occupational implications which include for example the cessation of engagement in occupations and the development of new configurations of occupations. On reviewing the occupational therapy and occupational science literature it is surprising that apart from a small number of notable exceptions, little research has explored the occupational nature of living with HIV infection.

This paper will present an overview of research which employed qualitative methods to explore the occupational nature of living with HIV. Oral histories were elicited from five men infected with HIV living in the UK. These oral histories were in-depth stories about each man's life from birth until the time of the last interview and ranged in duration from 4 to 16 hours of recorded material. The oral histories were each analysed individually using narrative methods, to produce a story that highlighted the occupational nature of living with HIV for each man. These stories provide a valuable insight into how each man came to live with HIV in the context of his occupational history. From the stories it is possible to begin to understand how living with a chronic illness, such as HIV infection, impacts on occupational engagement.