Title

Daily Occupations and Routines of Infants and Toddlers Assisted by Technology

Presenter Information

Dianne Rios

Start Time

16-10-2002 12:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2002 12:00 AM

Abstract

The use of medical technology has sustained the lives of many children with serious medical conditions. Feeding tubes, ventilators, tracheostomies, intravenous lines, and other medical devices help compensate for limited bodily functions that are vital to the child's survival. Infants and toddlers assisted by medical technology, however, face many unique challenges in their everyday lives that may impact their occupations and routines.

The challenges often faced by these children originate from both the nature of their conditions and the care they require. The medical conditions are such that the children often experience multiple illnesses, lengthy hospitalizations, and developmental delays, each of which may limit or disrupt occupations. The mobility- limiting nature of much of the equipment may compromise exploration and interaction with the environment, particularly with the greater community. The child typically spends a great deal of time receiving care, which may limit his or her available time for engaging in childhood occupations. Caregivers of children assisted by technology also devote considerable time and attention to intensive daily care, potentially limiting their emotional or temporal availability for child or familycentered occupations.

This presentation will discuss the results of a pilot study on the time use of nine infants and toddlers assisted by technology in three typical settings: hospital, home, and daycare. Selected study result s will be presented to highlight: 1.) the interaction between environment and time use; 2.) the significance of nursing care in a typical weekday routine; and 3.) methodological challenges of studying time use with children. Plans for the next stage of research, designed to capture the child's time use, factors influencing time use, and how families construct and maintain their child's daily occupations and routines, will also be discussed. It is hoped that understanding the complex nature of constructing daily occupations and routines in this population will assist therapists in providing sensitive and meaningful services for families.

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Oct 16th, 12:00 AM Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

Daily Occupations and Routines of Infants and Toddlers Assisted by Technology

The use of medical technology has sustained the lives of many children with serious medical conditions. Feeding tubes, ventilators, tracheostomies, intravenous lines, and other medical devices help compensate for limited bodily functions that are vital to the child's survival. Infants and toddlers assisted by medical technology, however, face many unique challenges in their everyday lives that may impact their occupations and routines.

The challenges often faced by these children originate from both the nature of their conditions and the care they require. The medical conditions are such that the children often experience multiple illnesses, lengthy hospitalizations, and developmental delays, each of which may limit or disrupt occupations. The mobility- limiting nature of much of the equipment may compromise exploration and interaction with the environment, particularly with the greater community. The child typically spends a great deal of time receiving care, which may limit his or her available time for engaging in childhood occupations. Caregivers of children assisted by technology also devote considerable time and attention to intensive daily care, potentially limiting their emotional or temporal availability for child or familycentered occupations.

This presentation will discuss the results of a pilot study on the time use of nine infants and toddlers assisted by technology in three typical settings: hospital, home, and daycare. Selected study result s will be presented to highlight: 1.) the interaction between environment and time use; 2.) the significance of nursing care in a typical weekday routine; and 3.) methodological challenges of studying time use with children. Plans for the next stage of research, designed to capture the child's time use, factors influencing time use, and how families construct and maintain their child's daily occupations and routines, will also be discussed. It is hoped that understanding the complex nature of constructing daily occupations and routines in this population will assist therapists in providing sensitive and meaningful services for families.