Title

Occupations of Adolescent Girls Living in Rural Communities

Presenter Information

Linda Buxell

Start Time

16-10-2002 12:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2002 12:00 AM

Abstract

Limited information is available on the study of occupations of adolescent girls living in the rural setting. This paper presents the beginnings of a qualitative study being completed by a faculty member and 2 graduate students in occupational therapy at the College of St. Catherine. This paper presents portions of a recent literature review regarding occupations of 13 - 18 year old adolescent girls living in the rural setting. Issues related to occupational choice, the use and development of skills and capabilities through participation in occupations, and how the community supports engagement in meaningful occupation will be explored. Results of qualitative, pilot study focus groups completed during the summer of 2003 will be shared.

Through qualitative methods, researcher investigators hope to gain the girls' perspective on their psychosocial well-being and meaningful existence as linked to their engagement in occupations within their respective communities. The research plan includes also interviews of parent(s) and or guardian(s) of these adolescent girls to more fully understand the occupations and well-being of these girls. Qualitative research planning and preliminary work relevant to the study will be discussed.

Through the use of later individual qualitative interviews, the study seeks to explore the meaning of occupations of adolescent girls living in various rural communities of Minnesota and western Wisconsin. The study hopes to access the subjective meaning of the occupations of these girls. Further developing the literature and the understand ing of the human as an occupational being will contribute to the field of occupational therapy and the developing discipline of occupational science. The elements of well-being, function, and meaningful existence related to engagement in occupations are some of the core areas of occupational therapy practice. There is a challenge to provide occupational therapy services to rural populations. Studying the occupations of adolescent girls living in their rural communities through qualitative interviewing with a focus on meaningful activity and well-being may support the need for a broad range of community and occupation based services.

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Oct 16th, 12:00 AM Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

Occupations of Adolescent Girls Living in Rural Communities

Limited information is available on the study of occupations of adolescent girls living in the rural setting. This paper presents the beginnings of a qualitative study being completed by a faculty member and 2 graduate students in occupational therapy at the College of St. Catherine. This paper presents portions of a recent literature review regarding occupations of 13 - 18 year old adolescent girls living in the rural setting. Issues related to occupational choice, the use and development of skills and capabilities through participation in occupations, and how the community supports engagement in meaningful occupation will be explored. Results of qualitative, pilot study focus groups completed during the summer of 2003 will be shared.

Through qualitative methods, researcher investigators hope to gain the girls' perspective on their psychosocial well-being and meaningful existence as linked to their engagement in occupations within their respective communities. The research plan includes also interviews of parent(s) and or guardian(s) of these adolescent girls to more fully understand the occupations and well-being of these girls. Qualitative research planning and preliminary work relevant to the study will be discussed.

Through the use of later individual qualitative interviews, the study seeks to explore the meaning of occupations of adolescent girls living in various rural communities of Minnesota and western Wisconsin. The study hopes to access the subjective meaning of the occupations of these girls. Further developing the literature and the understand ing of the human as an occupational being will contribute to the field of occupational therapy and the developing discipline of occupational science. The elements of well-being, function, and meaningful existence related to engagement in occupations are some of the core areas of occupational therapy practice. There is a challenge to provide occupational therapy services to rural populations. Studying the occupations of adolescent girls living in their rural communities through qualitative interviewing with a focus on meaningful activity and well-being may support the need for a broad range of community and occupation based services.