Title

Strategic Relevance: Using OS to Develop OT for At-Risk Youth

Start Time

16-10-2002 12:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2002 12:00 AM

Abstract

A sequence of three studies focused on the development of occupation-based interventions for at-risk youth in alternative and secure educational settings will be described. The purposes of the three studies were to: 1) pilot an efficacy study of occupational therapy programming for at-risk youth; 2) develop occupation-based interventions for at-risk youth that were student-centered, cost-effective, and unique to occupational therapy; and 3) refine and generate for broad dissemination occupation-based programming for at-risk youth in nontraditional school settings.

Action research was the central method of the studies. Primary data included videotaped interviews of at-risk youth regarding their occupational patterns and needs, and audiotaped therapist reflections regarding the development of central concepts in providing occupationbased interventions designed for at-risk youth.

The importance of developing innovative services for at-risk youth will be discussed within a broader consideration of the relation of occupational science to occupational therapy. By using occupational science as a basis for research into occupation-based interventions for atrisk youth, our research team honors the commitment of occupational science to the profession (Clark et al, 1991), responds to the needs of occupational beings, and demonstrates the strategic relevance of occupational science.

Comments

Specific date/time of presentation not currently reflected here.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 16th, 12:00 AM Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

Strategic Relevance: Using OS to Develop OT for At-Risk Youth

A sequence of three studies focused on the development of occupation-based interventions for at-risk youth in alternative and secure educational settings will be described. The purposes of the three studies were to: 1) pilot an efficacy study of occupational therapy programming for at-risk youth; 2) develop occupation-based interventions for at-risk youth that were student-centered, cost-effective, and unique to occupational therapy; and 3) refine and generate for broad dissemination occupation-based programming for at-risk youth in nontraditional school settings.

Action research was the central method of the studies. Primary data included videotaped interviews of at-risk youth regarding their occupational patterns and needs, and audiotaped therapist reflections regarding the development of central concepts in providing occupationbased interventions designed for at-risk youth.

The importance of developing innovative services for at-risk youth will be discussed within a broader consideration of the relation of occupational science to occupational therapy. By using occupational science as a basis for research into occupation-based interventions for atrisk youth, our research team honors the commitment of occupational science to the profession (Clark et al, 1991), responds to the needs of occupational beings, and demonstrates the strategic relevance of occupational science.