Title

The Occupation of Growing, a Research Society

Presenter Information

Lisa Ann Fagan
Jon A. Sanford

Start Time

29-10-2004 2:30 PM

End Time

29-10-2004 4:00 PM

Abstract

SSO: USA and the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) are two small research organizations that share similar histories, having grown out of the need to investigate the relationship of daily occupations/ human behavior, health and well-being, and theories grounded in the interaction between person, environment, and occupation/behavior. However, while EDRA formally began its life almost 35 years prior to SSO, and has grown from an organization of 30 members to an annual conference with300-400 participants, EDRA‚s strengths lie in its interdisciplinary approach to understanding the link between the environment and occupation/behavior.

It could be said that EDRA members think like occupational scientists‚ and that occupational scientists have adopted environment and behavior methodologies. So, as EDRA approaches 40 and SSO turns 3, each organization has much to share with, and learn from the other in understanding how to create robust, healthy lives. An organizational case study of these two small research societies will be presented. Similarities and differences in constituency, mission/purpose, and focus will be highlighted. Of particular interest to SSO members is how EDRA has changed over time to continue to respond to societal issues (such as the increasing incidence of obesity, and the needs of the aging population) by the formation of new special interest subsections (including the Active Living by Design group, and the Participation network) that reflect the needs and interests of all of its constituencies, including sponsors/funders, practitioners, educators, students and users/clients. These changes have been critical in the success of the members to secure grant-funding for research that enhances community participation through an understanding of person-environment-occupation fit.

This organizational case study will focus on a content analysis of topics presented at the EDRA conference in 1984, 1994 and 2004, to illustrate the change in focus and methodologies over time, as well as interviews of a representative sample of 2004 presenters rega rding the funding sources that supported their work.

Discussion will include reflections of a long-time (30+ years) EDRA member (a research architect), and a newer (2 years) EDRA member (an occupational scientist / occupational therapist), as well as suggestions for possible collaborations.

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Oct 29th, 2:30 PM Oct 29th, 4:00 PM

The Occupation of Growing, a Research Society

SSO: USA and the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) are two small research organizations that share similar histories, having grown out of the need to investigate the relationship of daily occupations/ human behavior, health and well-being, and theories grounded in the interaction between person, environment, and occupation/behavior. However, while EDRA formally began its life almost 35 years prior to SSO, and has grown from an organization of 30 members to an annual conference with300-400 participants, EDRA‚s strengths lie in its interdisciplinary approach to understanding the link between the environment and occupation/behavior.

It could be said that EDRA members think like occupational scientists‚ and that occupational scientists have adopted environment and behavior methodologies. So, as EDRA approaches 40 and SSO turns 3, each organization has much to share with, and learn from the other in understanding how to create robust, healthy lives. An organizational case study of these two small research societies will be presented. Similarities and differences in constituency, mission/purpose, and focus will be highlighted. Of particular interest to SSO members is how EDRA has changed over time to continue to respond to societal issues (such as the increasing incidence of obesity, and the needs of the aging population) by the formation of new special interest subsections (including the Active Living by Design group, and the Participation network) that reflect the needs and interests of all of its constituencies, including sponsors/funders, practitioners, educators, students and users/clients. These changes have been critical in the success of the members to secure grant-funding for research that enhances community participation through an understanding of person-environment-occupation fit.

This organizational case study will focus on a content analysis of topics presented at the EDRA conference in 1984, 1994 and 2004, to illustrate the change in focus and methodologies over time, as well as interviews of a representative sample of 2004 presenters rega rding the funding sources that supported their work.

Discussion will include reflections of a long-time (30+ years) EDRA member (a research architect), and a newer (2 years) EDRA member (an occupational scientist / occupational therapist), as well as suggestions for possible collaborations.