Title

Internet Study of the Health Related Quality of Life of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

Presenter Information

Karen Frank Barney

Start Time

30-10-2004 3:00 PM

End Time

30-10-2004 4:30 PM

Abstract

The overall goal of this exploratory Internet study of persons with spinal cord injuries (SCI) was to describe the impact of their sense of coherence (SOC), environmental barriers to participation, impairment, secondary conditions and demographic factors on their perceived health related quality of life (HRQoL). This approach is the first to combine these factors in a descriptive investigation on SCI. This quantitative study builds upon the findings of two preliminary qualitative studies on the nature of adjustment to SCI and the barriers to activities experienced by persons with SCI. The results of the research provide new information regarding factors that contribute to the support and the deterioration of the health of persons with SCI living in the community following discharge from their initial medical care. These findings may be used to guide the evolvement of more effective individually tailored occupation based interventions for persons with SCIs during their rehabilitation and post discharge adjustment in the community. No published studies have investigated HRQoL as a co-function of sense of coherence, environmental barriers to participation, and physical status. Collecting and analyzing data from a WWW based sample survey of persons with chronic SCI accomplished this goal. HRQoL was measured by the MOS SF-36 Version 2, adapted for persons with SCI. Environmental barriers to participation were measured by the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF). In addition, measures of the individual's Sense of Coherence and physical status, including 17 secondary conditions used with this population by the Massachusetts Department of Health and the New England Spinal Cord Center, contributed to the analysis of HRQoL. The MOS SF-36 eight subscale and mental and physical health summary findings were generally below the 25th percentile of the normative scores. Furthermore, risk factors for diminished HRQoL were examined, together with implications for support of the health and occupational well-being of persons with SCI. Since the use of the Internet as a survey method for this type of research is new, the limitations and the strengths of this medium for promoting participation among persons with SCI will also be discussed.

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Oct 30th, 3:00 PM Oct 30th, 4:30 PM

Internet Study of the Health Related Quality of Life of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

The overall goal of this exploratory Internet study of persons with spinal cord injuries (SCI) was to describe the impact of their sense of coherence (SOC), environmental barriers to participation, impairment, secondary conditions and demographic factors on their perceived health related quality of life (HRQoL). This approach is the first to combine these factors in a descriptive investigation on SCI. This quantitative study builds upon the findings of two preliminary qualitative studies on the nature of adjustment to SCI and the barriers to activities experienced by persons with SCI. The results of the research provide new information regarding factors that contribute to the support and the deterioration of the health of persons with SCI living in the community following discharge from their initial medical care. These findings may be used to guide the evolvement of more effective individually tailored occupation based interventions for persons with SCIs during their rehabilitation and post discharge adjustment in the community. No published studies have investigated HRQoL as a co-function of sense of coherence, environmental barriers to participation, and physical status. Collecting and analyzing data from a WWW based sample survey of persons with chronic SCI accomplished this goal. HRQoL was measured by the MOS SF-36 Version 2, adapted for persons with SCI. Environmental barriers to participation were measured by the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF). In addition, measures of the individual's Sense of Coherence and physical status, including 17 secondary conditions used with this population by the Massachusetts Department of Health and the New England Spinal Cord Center, contributed to the analysis of HRQoL. The MOS SF-36 eight subscale and mental and physical health summary findings were generally below the 25th percentile of the normative scores. Furthermore, risk factors for diminished HRQoL were examined, together with implications for support of the health and occupational well-being of persons with SCI. Since the use of the Internet as a survey method for this type of research is new, the limitations and the strengths of this medium for promoting participation among persons with SCI will also be discussed.