Title

Program Assessment of an Undergraduate Occupational Science Major

Presenter Information

Mary Lou Henderson

Start Time

30-10-2004 3:00 PM

End Time

30-10-2004 4:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present assessment data from the Occupational Science Program at the College of St. Catherine. The Occupational Therapy Department began planning this program in 1999 as part of the move from undergraduate to graduate entry level for occupational therapists. Faculty wanted a way to maintain departmental presence in undergraduate education. The major was approved by College faculty in May 1999 and was to be offered in the new Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. The Occupational Science Program started accepting students in September 2001. Currently three groups of students complete their baccalaureate degree through this major. Most of them are undergraduate students who enter the program as juniors and plan to complete both the baccalaureate in OS and their master’s degree in occupational therapy. The program for these students is evaluated as part of the occupational therapy program. The other two groups of students are those who plan to complete their baccalaureate in OS with an interdiscip linary focus or those who are already occupational therapy assistants and who want a degree completion program. The Occupational Science Program only gathers assessment data from these two groups.

Assessment is an important part of program development. It is critical for promoting and developing strengths, as well as identifying and addressing limitations. Informal assessment data has been collected throughout the three years of the occupational science major, but in 2004 a more formal program assessment was untaken. Current students and graduates were surveyed to determine their perceptions on many aspects related to the program. This data will be analyzed, summarized and programmatic recommendations will be developed. This information will be shared with participants with discussion regarding occupational science majors for individuals not going on to become occupational therapists.

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Oct 30th, 3:00 PM Oct 30th, 4:30 PM

Program Assessment of an Undergraduate Occupational Science Major

The purpose of this paper is to present assessment data from the Occupational Science Program at the College of St. Catherine. The Occupational Therapy Department began planning this program in 1999 as part of the move from undergraduate to graduate entry level for occupational therapists. Faculty wanted a way to maintain departmental presence in undergraduate education. The major was approved by College faculty in May 1999 and was to be offered in the new Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. The Occupational Science Program started accepting students in September 2001. Currently three groups of students complete their baccalaureate degree through this major. Most of them are undergraduate students who enter the program as juniors and plan to complete both the baccalaureate in OS and their master’s degree in occupational therapy. The program for these students is evaluated as part of the occupational therapy program. The other two groups of students are those who plan to complete their baccalaureate in OS with an interdiscip linary focus or those who are already occupational therapy assistants and who want a degree completion program. The Occupational Science Program only gathers assessment data from these two groups.

Assessment is an important part of program development. It is critical for promoting and developing strengths, as well as identifying and addressing limitations. Informal assessment data has been collected throughout the three years of the occupational science major, but in 2004 a more formal program assessment was untaken. Current students and graduates were surveyed to determine their perceptions on many aspects related to the program. This data will be analyzed, summarized and programmatic recommendations will be developed. This information will be shared with participants with discussion regarding occupational science majors for individuals not going on to become occupational therapists.