Title

The Occupation of Homework: Two is a Couple, Three is a Crowd

Presenter Information

Ruth Segal
Jim Hinojosa

Start Time

31-10-2004 10:20 AM

End Time

31-10-2004 11:50 AM

Abstract

Homework is a common family occupation in which school-age children and their parents engage in teacher generated assignments. Homework is considered an extension of school work in which children practice skills learned in school and learn new material. It is a school-related occupation that is superimposed on the daily schedules of families.

The expectation for parental involvement has changed historically. Currently parents are expected to be involved and knowledgeable about the homework assignments. The way parents translate involvement into actual life practices, however, is shaped by parental values and personalities and children‚s age, abilities, needs, and personalities.

Although, parent-child friction is a commonly described experience of homework, little has been done to discuss the nature the occupation of homework to enhance our understanding of the issues that lie behind such frictions.

A qualitative study focusing on homework experiences and the strategies that parents use to encourage their 7 - 11 years old children to complete their homework was conducted. Four parents of typically developing children and four parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes relating to parental experiences and strategies related to homework.

In this presentation, issues such as parental lack of control on the content, amount, and demands of homework impairs their ability to shape and construct a positive experience of homework for the family. These findings are discussed in relation to the findings of parental efforts to construct family occupations whose experience is positive for their children.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 31st, 10:20 AM Oct 31st, 11:50 AM

The Occupation of Homework: Two is a Couple, Three is a Crowd

Homework is a common family occupation in which school-age children and their parents engage in teacher generated assignments. Homework is considered an extension of school work in which children practice skills learned in school and learn new material. It is a school-related occupation that is superimposed on the daily schedules of families.

The expectation for parental involvement has changed historically. Currently parents are expected to be involved and knowledgeable about the homework assignments. The way parents translate involvement into actual life practices, however, is shaped by parental values and personalities and children‚s age, abilities, needs, and personalities.

Although, parent-child friction is a commonly described experience of homework, little has been done to discuss the nature the occupation of homework to enhance our understanding of the issues that lie behind such frictions.

A qualitative study focusing on homework experiences and the strategies that parents use to encourage their 7 - 11 years old children to complete their homework was conducted. Four parents of typically developing children and four parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes relating to parental experiences and strategies related to homework.

In this presentation, issues such as parental lack of control on the content, amount, and demands of homework impairs their ability to shape and construct a positive experience of homework for the family. These findings are discussed in relation to the findings of parental efforts to construct family occupations whose experience is positive for their children.