Title

A Historical Analysis of the Occupation of Writing and its Application to Occupational Science

Presenter Information

Christopher J. Alterio

Start Time

29-10-2004 2:30 PM

End Time

29-10-2004 4:00 PM

Abstract

The occupation of writing has had a significant impact on individuals and societies; writing demands serious inquiry and study by occupational scientists. This paper provides a review of the richness of the occupation of writing and describes how writing has been important for individual and societal development across time. Studying historical events and literary examples of writing provides insight into the way that diverse fields of history, literature, philosophy, religion, sociology, anthropology, and psychology all intersected in the developmental course of human knowledge and in the establishment of the associated occupation of writing.

Once people within societies developed an advanced sense of self- identity, writers began to explore their own lives more deeply. This led to the modern age where writing was commonplace and then led into the post- modern era when many people participate in this activity in everyday journaling and through online virtual contexts. Writing offers a rich source of narrative information for understanding our historicity and for conducting inquiries into other occupations. Occupational scientists who understand the power of writing will be able to use it both as a research methodology as well as a subject itself for further inquiry. Occupational scientists should be particularly interested in studying hypertext as a new form of communication and self-expression. The accessible format of online journaling and the associated proliferation of journaling websites are both examples of instant hypertext sources of data for qualitative studies.

The occupation of writing has a complex and critical role in human history. Occupational scientists should be acutely interested in investigating the ways that writing has an empowering effect on human and social development across time. Occupational scientists should be able to access this type of narrative information for continued development of knowledge in occupational science.

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Oct 29th, 2:30 PM Oct 29th, 4:00 PM

A Historical Analysis of the Occupation of Writing and its Application to Occupational Science

The occupation of writing has had a significant impact on individuals and societies; writing demands serious inquiry and study by occupational scientists. This paper provides a review of the richness of the occupation of writing and describes how writing has been important for individual and societal development across time. Studying historical events and literary examples of writing provides insight into the way that diverse fields of history, literature, philosophy, religion, sociology, anthropology, and psychology all intersected in the developmental course of human knowledge and in the establishment of the associated occupation of writing.

Once people within societies developed an advanced sense of self- identity, writers began to explore their own lives more deeply. This led to the modern age where writing was commonplace and then led into the post- modern era when many people participate in this activity in everyday journaling and through online virtual contexts. Writing offers a rich source of narrative information for understanding our historicity and for conducting inquiries into other occupations. Occupational scientists who understand the power of writing will be able to use it both as a research methodology as well as a subject itself for further inquiry. Occupational scientists should be particularly interested in studying hypertext as a new form of communication and self-expression. The accessible format of online journaling and the associated proliferation of journaling websites are both examples of instant hypertext sources of data for qualitative studies.

The occupation of writing has a complex and critical role in human history. Occupational scientists should be acutely interested in investigating the ways that writing has an empowering effect on human and social development across time. Occupational scientists should be able to access this type of narrative information for continued development of knowledge in occupational science.