Title

The Meaning of Boredom to Adults Recovering from Substance Use Disorder

Presenter Information

Antonietta Corvinelli

Start Time

30-10-2004 8:30 AM

End Time

30-10-2004 10:00 AM

Abstract

The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the meaning of boredom from the perspective of adults recovering from substance use disorder. Seven males and one female recovering from Substance Use disorder were interviewed for this preliminary post-professional master‚s level study. Six of the eight participants were intravenous drug users. Participants were recruited from an urban day treatment center offering treatment to people with HIV/AIDS. Three themes were identified: boredom as a precursor, activities and boredom, and patterns of boredom as recovery progresses. Boredom was experienced as a precursor to using drugs. Boredom also triggered self-examination: Past loss, incomplete achievement, and lack of life meaning and purpose were recalled when bored. Alongside boredom, anxiety, frustration, worry and depression were remarked. Participants reported being alone and doing nothing while bored. In response to boredom, experienced as especially overwhelming in early recovery, drug use was reported. Later in recovery, a wider repertoire of activities, were employed. In addition, boredom was tolerated. The importance of recognizing and attending to boredom persisted, regardless of the length of time in recovery. A definition and model were synthesized from these themes. This master‚s level project is a beginning for continuing doctoral work. It is the intent of this writer to isolate the experience of boredom for substance users in recovery. Given the sample characteristics (HIV/AIDS), comparison groups will be interviewed. Four participants not known to be substance users have thus far been interviewed. In contrast to substance users, boredom was identified with respect to specific occupations such as work. Boredom was experienced as less expansive. Normal participants will continue to be interviewed. In addition, users of other drugs of choice besides intravenous heroin, as well as participants with HIV/AIDS not known to be substance users, will be interviewed. In this way, a limitation of the preliminary study can be addressed. Occupational therapists are in a position to incorporate boredom coping in the treatment of substance use.

Understanding clients‚ particular experiences of boredom at the appropriate stage of recovery will enable practitioners to grade and adapt purposeful occupations, a crucial addition to relapse prevention.

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Oct 30th, 8:30 AM Oct 30th, 10:00 AM

The Meaning of Boredom to Adults Recovering from Substance Use Disorder

The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the meaning of boredom from the perspective of adults recovering from substance use disorder. Seven males and one female recovering from Substance Use disorder were interviewed for this preliminary post-professional master‚s level study. Six of the eight participants were intravenous drug users. Participants were recruited from an urban day treatment center offering treatment to people with HIV/AIDS. Three themes were identified: boredom as a precursor, activities and boredom, and patterns of boredom as recovery progresses. Boredom was experienced as a precursor to using drugs. Boredom also triggered self-examination: Past loss, incomplete achievement, and lack of life meaning and purpose were recalled when bored. Alongside boredom, anxiety, frustration, worry and depression were remarked. Participants reported being alone and doing nothing while bored. In response to boredom, experienced as especially overwhelming in early recovery, drug use was reported. Later in recovery, a wider repertoire of activities, were employed. In addition, boredom was tolerated. The importance of recognizing and attending to boredom persisted, regardless of the length of time in recovery. A definition and model were synthesized from these themes. This master‚s level project is a beginning for continuing doctoral work. It is the intent of this writer to isolate the experience of boredom for substance users in recovery. Given the sample characteristics (HIV/AIDS), comparison groups will be interviewed. Four participants not known to be substance users have thus far been interviewed. In contrast to substance users, boredom was identified with respect to specific occupations such as work. Boredom was experienced as less expansive. Normal participants will continue to be interviewed. In addition, users of other drugs of choice besides intravenous heroin, as well as participants with HIV/AIDS not known to be substance users, will be interviewed. In this way, a limitation of the preliminary study can be addressed. Occupational therapists are in a position to incorporate boredom coping in the treatment of substance use.

Understanding clients‚ particular experiences of boredom at the appropriate stage of recovery will enable practitioners to grade and adapt purposeful occupations, a crucial addition to relapse prevention.