Title

Parenting the Child with Asthma: Managing Uncertainty and Making Choices to Assert Control

Presenter Information

Ellen S. Cohn

Start Time

30-10-2004 8:30 AM

End Time

30-10-2004 10:00 AM

Abstract

Asthma, a common chronic childhood disease, is considered a national epidemic affecting approximately 4.4 million children in the United States. Minority children experience higher rates of asthma diagnosis, severity, asthma caused disability, greater emergency room visits and hospitalizations than other children. Although the underlying cause of these disparities is not well understood, research has suggested that parenting beliefs and family routines are important factors to understand asthma management. Embedded in parents‚ routines and approaches to managing asthma are cultural explanatory models; parents‚ personal and implicit beliefs about illness that describe the nature and origin of the disease and what can be done about it. Thus, a greater understanding of how families arrange parenting occupations to manage childhood asthma and parents‚ cultural models of health and illness may contribute to understanding the existing disparities. The meanings parents bring to the parenting occupations become clearer when culturally valued parenting goals and belief systems are examined. This paper describes the occupation of parenting children with a chronic disease; specifically how parents create asthma management routines for their children and families, and make decisions to control the uncertainty associated with an unpredictable, often symptomless disease that requires complex medication regimens with troublesome side effects.

The proposed paper is based on preliminary findings from a NIH funded research project investigating “Communication, Perspectives, & Childhood Asthma Disparities” (NICHD RO1 HD044070) and a metasynthesis of qualitative studies exploring the occupation of parenting children with asthma and cultural-based explanatory models. Forty parents of children with persistent asthma receiving health care at a an inner-city academic medical center serving predominantly minority populations and parents receiving health care at a multi-specialty provider group serving a socio-economically diverse population were interviewed about how they manage their children’s asthma within the context of their daily parenting occupations and their understanding of the nature and cause of asthma, their knowledge and attitudes, beliefs about medications and intervention. Preliminary data analysis will be presented and questions will be posed to the audience to generate discussion related to occupational life styles and cultural based explanatory models of health care among parents with various racial and ethnic identities.

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Oct 30th, 8:30 AM Oct 30th, 10:00 AM

Parenting the Child with Asthma: Managing Uncertainty and Making Choices to Assert Control

Asthma, a common chronic childhood disease, is considered a national epidemic affecting approximately 4.4 million children in the United States. Minority children experience higher rates of asthma diagnosis, severity, asthma caused disability, greater emergency room visits and hospitalizations than other children. Although the underlying cause of these disparities is not well understood, research has suggested that parenting beliefs and family routines are important factors to understand asthma management. Embedded in parents‚ routines and approaches to managing asthma are cultural explanatory models; parents‚ personal and implicit beliefs about illness that describe the nature and origin of the disease and what can be done about it. Thus, a greater understanding of how families arrange parenting occupations to manage childhood asthma and parents‚ cultural models of health and illness may contribute to understanding the existing disparities. The meanings parents bring to the parenting occupations become clearer when culturally valued parenting goals and belief systems are examined. This paper describes the occupation of parenting children with a chronic disease; specifically how parents create asthma management routines for their children and families, and make decisions to control the uncertainty associated with an unpredictable, often symptomless disease that requires complex medication regimens with troublesome side effects.

The proposed paper is based on preliminary findings from a NIH funded research project investigating “Communication, Perspectives, & Childhood Asthma Disparities” (NICHD RO1 HD044070) and a metasynthesis of qualitative studies exploring the occupation of parenting children with asthma and cultural-based explanatory models. Forty parents of children with persistent asthma receiving health care at a an inner-city academic medical center serving predominantly minority populations and parents receiving health care at a multi-specialty provider group serving a socio-economically diverse population were interviewed about how they manage their children’s asthma within the context of their daily parenting occupations and their understanding of the nature and cause of asthma, their knowledge and attitudes, beliefs about medications and intervention. Preliminary data analysis will be presented and questions will be posed to the audience to generate discussion related to occupational life styles and cultural based explanatory models of health care among parents with various racial and ethnic identities.