Title

The Occupation of Household Financial Management Among Lesbian Couples

Presenter Information

Diana M. Bailey
Jeanne M. Jackson

Start Time

29-10-2004 2:30 PM

End Time

29-10-2004 4:00 PM

Abstract

Occupational science seeks to explicate the everyday activities of individuals within their social and cultural worlds. This research paper is concerned with the occupation of "doing finances" within the context of creating a home as a couple. Financial management is one facet of a larger study examining how lesbian couples create home through occupations. Thirteen couples were interviewed individually, in their homes, to address the question: How do lesbian couples go about creating a home together through engagement in household occupations? Financial management was a 'found' topic that emerged spontaneously from the interviewees. A modified grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2000; Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and Polkinghorne's (1995) approach to narrative enquiry were used to analyze data from this qualitative study.

Thirteen couples were interviewed individually, in their homes, to address the question: How do lesbian couples go about creating a home together through engagement in household occupations? Financial management was a 'found' topic that emerged spontaneously from the interviewees. A modified grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2000; Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and Polkinghorne's (1995) approach to narrative enquiry were used to analyze data from this qualitative study.

Three major findings will be presented: a) Approaches to Money Management, b) the Dynamic Nature of Financial Management, and c) Being Lesbian in Today's Society; each has several subtexts.

Implications for occupational science will be discussed. We will suggest why occupational scientists may want to redefine the traditional 'division of labor' approach to household tasks, instead positioning household work as occupation. An occupational science approach might include concepts of fairness and balance related to how household care has been lived out over a lifetime, and creative approaches taken to such mundane occupations as doing finances. Second, we will highlight how equal respect for paid and non-paid work can influence negotiation styles within the home. Finally, we will show that people engaged in seemingly personal occupations are actually situated in le gal, social, and political realms that influence their occupations, in this case household financial management.

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Oct 29th, 2:30 PM Oct 29th, 4:00 PM

The Occupation of Household Financial Management Among Lesbian Couples

Occupational science seeks to explicate the everyday activities of individuals within their social and cultural worlds. This research paper is concerned with the occupation of "doing finances" within the context of creating a home as a couple. Financial management is one facet of a larger study examining how lesbian couples create home through occupations. Thirteen couples were interviewed individually, in their homes, to address the question: How do lesbian couples go about creating a home together through engagement in household occupations? Financial management was a 'found' topic that emerged spontaneously from the interviewees. A modified grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2000; Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and Polkinghorne's (1995) approach to narrative enquiry were used to analyze data from this qualitative study.

Thirteen couples were interviewed individually, in their homes, to address the question: How do lesbian couples go about creating a home together through engagement in household occupations? Financial management was a 'found' topic that emerged spontaneously from the interviewees. A modified grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2000; Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and Polkinghorne's (1995) approach to narrative enquiry were used to analyze data from this qualitative study.

Three major findings will be presented: a) Approaches to Money Management, b) the Dynamic Nature of Financial Management, and c) Being Lesbian in Today's Society; each has several subtexts.

Implications for occupational science will be discussed. We will suggest why occupational scientists may want to redefine the traditional 'division of labor' approach to household tasks, instead positioning household work as occupation. An occupational science approach might include concepts of fairness and balance related to how household care has been lived out over a lifetime, and creative approaches taken to such mundane occupations as doing finances. Second, we will highlight how equal respect for paid and non-paid work can influence negotiation styles within the home. Finally, we will show that people engaged in seemingly personal occupations are actually situated in le gal, social, and political realms that influence their occupations, in this case household financial management.