Title

Quality of Life Comparison of Post Mastectomy Women with and without Breast Reconstruction: An Occupational Science Perspective

Start Time

29-10-2005 3:00 PM

End Time

29-10-2005 4:05 PM

Abstract

Do women who have a breast mastectomy and reconstructive surgery have less quality of life issues than women who do not have reconstructive surgery and elect for breast prosthesis? This literature presentation will review various research findings that addressed quality of life issues for post-mastectomy women with and without breast reconstruction. Despite medical advancements in breast cancer prevention, many women still face the ultimate challenge of total mastectomy. Quantities of research address the issue of breast cancer, but few look at the effects of quality of life experiences related to the outcome of the rehabilitation intervention. Following mastectomy, women can have significant psychological, social and sexual morbidity that could seriously affect their occupational pursuits. Literature reveals data on how emotional and psychosocial issues, as well as temporal decision making, chronological relevance, and culture influences whether or not women return to their occupational engagements and roles. Human beings have an innate need for occupation (Wilcock, 1998). Humans have certain roles and occupations that they need to take on in order to flourish in life. When women go through an experience as traumatic as a mastectomy, their occupations and roles are affected. An occupation-based approach to working with women recovering from breast cancer and mastectomy will be introduced to encourage occupational science and occupational therapy research.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 29th, 3:00 PM Oct 29th, 4:05 PM

Quality of Life Comparison of Post Mastectomy Women with and without Breast Reconstruction: An Occupational Science Perspective

Do women who have a breast mastectomy and reconstructive surgery have less quality of life issues than women who do not have reconstructive surgery and elect for breast prosthesis? This literature presentation will review various research findings that addressed quality of life issues for post-mastectomy women with and without breast reconstruction. Despite medical advancements in breast cancer prevention, many women still face the ultimate challenge of total mastectomy. Quantities of research address the issue of breast cancer, but few look at the effects of quality of life experiences related to the outcome of the rehabilitation intervention. Following mastectomy, women can have significant psychological, social and sexual morbidity that could seriously affect their occupational pursuits. Literature reveals data on how emotional and psychosocial issues, as well as temporal decision making, chronological relevance, and culture influences whether or not women return to their occupational engagements and roles. Human beings have an innate need for occupation (Wilcock, 1998). Humans have certain roles and occupations that they need to take on in order to flourish in life. When women go through an experience as traumatic as a mastectomy, their occupations and roles are affected. An occupation-based approach to working with women recovering from breast cancer and mastectomy will be introduced to encourage occupational science and occupational therapy research.