Title

M.A.P. to Reentry: Maximizing the Adaptation Process for Correctional to Community Transition

Presenter Information

Toby Hamilton

Start Time

28-10-2005 10:35 AM

End Time

28-10-2005 12:15 PM

Abstract

This paper reports qualitative research investigating the relationship of adaptive patterns in the life story to the experience of women residents of a halfway house that assists inmates reentering the community from state prisons. The research investigates if women who reflect on their life stories, important life turning points, and patterns of adaptation can apply them successfully to present and future occupational challenges of community reintegration.

The national annual rate of growth for incarcerated women is 1.5 times higher than that of men. Prisons release most women, primarily nonviolent drug offenders, with the same problems that contributed to incarceration. In the state in which the research was conducted, the female incarceration rate is 143% higher than the national average, a statistic in which it has led the nation since 1993, and the percentage of prison receptions for drug possession is twice the national average for women. These women face challenges of finding employment, housing, health care, and day care, if they are able to reunite with their children, while coping with stigma and restrictions in employment, public assistance, and maintaining contact with their children.

The life story or any part of it is an ideal method for studying adaptation. Its content and form (how the story is told) reveal three elements vital to understanding the past and shaping present and future occupation: 1) One’s perception of reality and identity; 2) Life turning points or “moment(s) of revelation in a life” and 3) Adaptive and dysadaptive occupational patterns. The researcher will share preliminary results of an intervention process using the life story, its turning points, and adaptive patterns as tools for making life maps to maximize the adaptation process for successful community reintegration.

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Oct 28th, 10:35 AM Oct 28th, 12:15 PM

M.A.P. to Reentry: Maximizing the Adaptation Process for Correctional to Community Transition

This paper reports qualitative research investigating the relationship of adaptive patterns in the life story to the experience of women residents of a halfway house that assists inmates reentering the community from state prisons. The research investigates if women who reflect on their life stories, important life turning points, and patterns of adaptation can apply them successfully to present and future occupational challenges of community reintegration.

The national annual rate of growth for incarcerated women is 1.5 times higher than that of men. Prisons release most women, primarily nonviolent drug offenders, with the same problems that contributed to incarceration. In the state in which the research was conducted, the female incarceration rate is 143% higher than the national average, a statistic in which it has led the nation since 1993, and the percentage of prison receptions for drug possession is twice the national average for women. These women face challenges of finding employment, housing, health care, and day care, if they are able to reunite with their children, while coping with stigma and restrictions in employment, public assistance, and maintaining contact with their children.

The life story or any part of it is an ideal method for studying adaptation. Its content and form (how the story is told) reveal three elements vital to understanding the past and shaping present and future occupation: 1) One’s perception of reality and identity; 2) Life turning points or “moment(s) of revelation in a life” and 3) Adaptive and dysadaptive occupational patterns. The researcher will share preliminary results of an intervention process using the life story, its turning points, and adaptive patterns as tools for making life maps to maximize the adaptation process for successful community reintegration.