Title

Coming to Know About How to Do Songs

Start Time

29-10-2005 1:00 PM

End Time

29-10-2005 2:40 PM

Abstract

Human activity is rooted in a society’s past and within a community there is continuity in the form and meaning from one generation to the next. This research asks: what brings about appropriation of an occupation and how does implicit learning about how to engage in an activity become explicit knowledge about the activity? Research on implicit learning about how things are done suggests this ability is not age dependent, eliminating the need to suggest a prerequisite for learning about an activity. The issue then is making what is known available to reflection and consciousness. Schutz argued that that memory of action and reflection play roles in awareness of activity. Furthermore, he suggested objective observation made the unknown phenomenon such as another person’s experiences known. Though he wrote about the philosophy supporting a research method, this paper suggests that similar interpretive processes lead children to appreciate an activity fills a period of time, requires sequenced actions with standards of performance and the rules that can be adjusted. This paper focuses on how participation in classroom songs brings about the transmission of an activity from adult to child and transformations in very young children’s occupations by making implicit understanding explicit knowledge.

Fieldnotes analyzed for different ways childcare providers and children in an infant/toddler classroom participate in songs, suggested watching and doing with others contributed to development of a childhood occupation. The work here furthers our understanding of this process. Initially, adults managed unfolding events building infants’ social participation in songs. Interrupted flow of an activity supported reflective awareness. Watching one another exposed children to different forms and meanings that could be compared to their own participation in the songs. Routines triggered anticipation of the future activity so when hopes were fulfilled children gained experiences with expectations and recall that could be related to future activity. The research finds that young children gain explicit knowledge about their own and peers’ occupations so that they react to violations in how the activity is performed (suggesting appropriation of cultural knowledge about the activity).

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Oct 29th, 1:00 PM Oct 29th, 2:40 PM

Coming to Know About How to Do Songs

Human activity is rooted in a society’s past and within a community there is continuity in the form and meaning from one generation to the next. This research asks: what brings about appropriation of an occupation and how does implicit learning about how to engage in an activity become explicit knowledge about the activity? Research on implicit learning about how things are done suggests this ability is not age dependent, eliminating the need to suggest a prerequisite for learning about an activity. The issue then is making what is known available to reflection and consciousness. Schutz argued that that memory of action and reflection play roles in awareness of activity. Furthermore, he suggested objective observation made the unknown phenomenon such as another person’s experiences known. Though he wrote about the philosophy supporting a research method, this paper suggests that similar interpretive processes lead children to appreciate an activity fills a period of time, requires sequenced actions with standards of performance and the rules that can be adjusted. This paper focuses on how participation in classroom songs brings about the transmission of an activity from adult to child and transformations in very young children’s occupations by making implicit understanding explicit knowledge.

Fieldnotes analyzed for different ways childcare providers and children in an infant/toddler classroom participate in songs, suggested watching and doing with others contributed to development of a childhood occupation. The work here furthers our understanding of this process. Initially, adults managed unfolding events building infants’ social participation in songs. Interrupted flow of an activity supported reflective awareness. Watching one another exposed children to different forms and meanings that could be compared to their own participation in the songs. Routines triggered anticipation of the future activity so when hopes were fulfilled children gained experiences with expectations and recall that could be related to future activity. The research finds that young children gain explicit knowledge about their own and peers’ occupations so that they react to violations in how the activity is performed (suggesting appropriation of cultural knowledge about the activity).