Title

Two Becoming One: Immigrant Indian Women Sustaining Sense of Self and Well-Being through Doing

Presenter Information

Shoba Nayar

Start Time

28-10-2005 4:00 PM

End Time

28-10-2005 5:40 PM

Abstract

In discussing the relationship between person, environment and occupation, the occupational science literature has assumed a match between persons’ culture of origin, their culturally embedded knowledge of occupation, and the culture shaping their environment. For migrants and refugees, this assumption may not be accurate. Accordingly, this grounded theory study asked how immigrant Indian women sustain their sense of self and well-being through doing in the New Zealand context.

Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight women of Indian origin who had immigrated within the past five years. Using grounded theory methodology involving constant comparative analysis, a model explaining the occupational processes these immigrants experience was generated. Three interconnecting processes were identified.

The first process women experience is Oh God, Where Did I Come?, which describes how being in an unfamiliar environment initially compels them to do familiar activities that boost their confidence and support a sense of well-being. The second process, Being In The Change, sees women getting to know their environment and engaging in new occupations, while continuing to do familiar activities. A New Zealander With An Indian Soul finds women doing more occupations the ‘Kiwi way’ as they embrace a strengthening sense of self and well-being in a new land. Central to these processes is the core category Two Becoming One. This process is a commentary on the women’s journey of integrating two cultures, with vastly different understandings of women’s identity, ways of doing things and environmental opportunities, while maintaining a healthy sense of self.

The presentation highlights the dynamic interplay that occurs at the person-environment-occupation interface. Situating the findings within current literature reveals limited understanding of this interplay from an occupational perspective within the literature that addresses the immigration experience. With an increasing trend of immigration worldwide, this study brings to light the importance of understanding the influence that the environment has on occupation and the resulting impact for persons’ perception of themselves as competent people. Further research in this area is required to gain deeper awareness of the ways in which people interact with their environment and the resultant effect on occupational performance.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 28th, 4:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:40 PM

Two Becoming One: Immigrant Indian Women Sustaining Sense of Self and Well-Being through Doing

In discussing the relationship between person, environment and occupation, the occupational science literature has assumed a match between persons’ culture of origin, their culturally embedded knowledge of occupation, and the culture shaping their environment. For migrants and refugees, this assumption may not be accurate. Accordingly, this grounded theory study asked how immigrant Indian women sustain their sense of self and well-being through doing in the New Zealand context.

Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight women of Indian origin who had immigrated within the past five years. Using grounded theory methodology involving constant comparative analysis, a model explaining the occupational processes these immigrants experience was generated. Three interconnecting processes were identified.

The first process women experience is Oh God, Where Did I Come?, which describes how being in an unfamiliar environment initially compels them to do familiar activities that boost their confidence and support a sense of well-being. The second process, Being In The Change, sees women getting to know their environment and engaging in new occupations, while continuing to do familiar activities. A New Zealander With An Indian Soul finds women doing more occupations the ‘Kiwi way’ as they embrace a strengthening sense of self and well-being in a new land. Central to these processes is the core category Two Becoming One. This process is a commentary on the women’s journey of integrating two cultures, with vastly different understandings of women’s identity, ways of doing things and environmental opportunities, while maintaining a healthy sense of self.

The presentation highlights the dynamic interplay that occurs at the person-environment-occupation interface. Situating the findings within current literature reveals limited understanding of this interplay from an occupational perspective within the literature that addresses the immigration experience. With an increasing trend of immigration worldwide, this study brings to light the importance of understanding the influence that the environment has on occupation and the resulting impact for persons’ perception of themselves as competent people. Further research in this area is required to gain deeper awareness of the ways in which people interact with their environment and the resultant effect on occupational performance.