Title

Ethnography on Spending Sundays at Statue Square in Hong Kong - An Occupation within the Filipina Domestic Worker Subculture: Implications to the Clinical, Social, Educational, and Political Role of Occupational Scientists

Start Time

28-10-2005 4:00 PM

End Time

28-10-2005 5:40 PM

Abstract

Tens of thousands of Filipina domestics spend their Sundays at Statue Square in Hong Kong. The assemblage transforms the square into a provisional society that serves as the workers’ “home away from home.” This paper presents ethnographic data that define the form, functions, and meanings of the weekly gathering as an occupation within the Filipina domestic subculture in Hong Kong.

In addition, this study found that while working in Hong Kong, Filipina domestic workers are faced with an environmental context that present risk factors for multiple occupational problems, such as occupational deprivation, occupational imbalance, and occupational alienation. Nonetheless, every Sunday, the workers transformed the square into a liminal sphere that detached them from alienating social structures wherein a special camaraderie of sisterhood with their peers bridged many types of socio-cultural disruptions. The event also provided many workers with temporally and spatially demarcated opportunities for leisure and self-chosen activities that enhanced occupational engagement and ameliorated feelings of deprivation and imbalance. Thus, this study exemplifies how the Filipina migrant workers are occupational beings in action that show relationships and positive influences of occupational engagement to health and well-being.

Overall, this presentation aims to explore how occupational scientists can have a greater role in the clinical, social, educational, and political arenas of public health. How can occupational science research inform program development that aim to alleviate occupational problems? How can occupational scientists increase individual, community, and political awareness that can lead to social and economic changes? Can occupational scientists be advocates for social justice to uphold equitable distributions of resources for occupational engagement within local and international spheres?

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Oct 28th, 4:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:40 PM

Ethnography on Spending Sundays at Statue Square in Hong Kong - An Occupation within the Filipina Domestic Worker Subculture: Implications to the Clinical, Social, Educational, and Political Role of Occupational Scientists

Tens of thousands of Filipina domestics spend their Sundays at Statue Square in Hong Kong. The assemblage transforms the square into a provisional society that serves as the workers’ “home away from home.” This paper presents ethnographic data that define the form, functions, and meanings of the weekly gathering as an occupation within the Filipina domestic subculture in Hong Kong.

In addition, this study found that while working in Hong Kong, Filipina domestic workers are faced with an environmental context that present risk factors for multiple occupational problems, such as occupational deprivation, occupational imbalance, and occupational alienation. Nonetheless, every Sunday, the workers transformed the square into a liminal sphere that detached them from alienating social structures wherein a special camaraderie of sisterhood with their peers bridged many types of socio-cultural disruptions. The event also provided many workers with temporally and spatially demarcated opportunities for leisure and self-chosen activities that enhanced occupational engagement and ameliorated feelings of deprivation and imbalance. Thus, this study exemplifies how the Filipina migrant workers are occupational beings in action that show relationships and positive influences of occupational engagement to health and well-being.

Overall, this presentation aims to explore how occupational scientists can have a greater role in the clinical, social, educational, and political arenas of public health. How can occupational science research inform program development that aim to alleviate occupational problems? How can occupational scientists increase individual, community, and political awareness that can lead to social and economic changes? Can occupational scientists be advocates for social justice to uphold equitable distributions of resources for occupational engagement within local and international spheres?