Title

Theater and Self: Putting Self-Concept into Play

Presenter Information

Jenna Yeager, Towson University

Start Time

29-10-2005 8:50 AM

End Time

29-10-2005 10:30 AM

Abstract

This paper will present the results of research conducted for a doctoral dissertation. The purpose of the research was to investigate the experience of college students engaged in the occupations associated with a major in theater, specifically in relation to the development of self-concept. A qualitative, interpretive case study method was used to gather and analyze the meaning of the experiences of four students majoring in theater at a comprehensive university. A series of interviews was conducted with each participant and multiple observations yielded ethnographic data regarding salient features of the context. Data analysis was carried out via analytic induction and constant comparative analysis. Key ideas that emerged were collapsed to derive primary themes within and across cases.

Data analysis revealed aspects of engagement in theater occupations that were described by participants as meaningful in terms of developing self-concept. Specifically, it was noted that elements of play production, as well as aspects of the associated academic coursework, contributed to a context that participants described as conducive to self-concept development. Accordingly, participants noted that self-reflection and introspection were key aspects of character development and that engagement in these activities influenced self-concept development. Furthermore, experiences related to auditioning, typecasting, and aspects of play production were described as meaningful and relevant to self-concept development by the participant group.

Thus, the results of this research supported the notion that engagement in the occupations associated with an undergraduate theater major influenced self-concept development among this sample group. In this presentation, results will be described in terms of the relation between occupational engagement and identity development, including discussion of the implications for academic contexts.

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Oct 29th, 8:50 AM Oct 29th, 10:30 AM

Theater and Self: Putting Self-Concept into Play

This paper will present the results of research conducted for a doctoral dissertation. The purpose of the research was to investigate the experience of college students engaged in the occupations associated with a major in theater, specifically in relation to the development of self-concept. A qualitative, interpretive case study method was used to gather and analyze the meaning of the experiences of four students majoring in theater at a comprehensive university. A series of interviews was conducted with each participant and multiple observations yielded ethnographic data regarding salient features of the context. Data analysis was carried out via analytic induction and constant comparative analysis. Key ideas that emerged were collapsed to derive primary themes within and across cases.

Data analysis revealed aspects of engagement in theater occupations that were described by participants as meaningful in terms of developing self-concept. Specifically, it was noted that elements of play production, as well as aspects of the associated academic coursework, contributed to a context that participants described as conducive to self-concept development. Accordingly, participants noted that self-reflection and introspection were key aspects of character development and that engagement in these activities influenced self-concept development. Furthermore, experiences related to auditioning, typecasting, and aspects of play production were described as meaningful and relevant to self-concept development by the participant group.

Thus, the results of this research supported the notion that engagement in the occupations associated with an undergraduate theater major influenced self-concept development among this sample group. In this presentation, results will be described in terms of the relation between occupational engagement and identity development, including discussion of the implications for academic contexts.