Title

The Power, Meaning, and Value of Occupations: A Study of Organic Farmers and Their Choice Against Convention

Start Time

29-10-2005 1:00 PM

End Time

29-10-2005 2:40 PM

Abstract

This study of small scale, regionally-supplying, organic farmers highlights personal meaning and purpose and societal impact of a chosen occupation. Organic farmers embody the connection between occupational behavior, its effects on larger social and ecological systems, and personal and societal health and well-being. These farmers make a daily choice to practice farming against conventional methods and go to great lengths physically, mentally, and economically to participate in an occupation they deem meaningful, well-respected, and vital to the future of our environment.

Three North Carolina organic farmers were interviewed at length for this study and additional data were gathered through participant observation at the Carrboro (NC) Farmer’s Market, one of the most highly regarded and modeled farmer’s markets in the country and through a detailed analysis of one year of the magazine Sierra, the official publication of the environmental advocacy group, the Sierra Club. I describe the nature and levels of organic farming, the individuals who choose organic options, the rationale for decisions to produce organically, and the loci of organic farming and regional farmers’ markets. The discussion focuses on the complexity and nature of the occupations of organic farming, and selling and buying at regional farmers’ markets and the individuals who choose careers, activities, or lifestyles that go against traditional and conventional practices of the dominant culture. The study of such occupational choices, based as they are on ethical concerns, has the potential to inform occupational science with respect to issues of community and ecological well-being raised by Wilcock (1998) and others.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 29th, 1:00 PM Oct 29th, 2:40 PM

The Power, Meaning, and Value of Occupations: A Study of Organic Farmers and Their Choice Against Convention

This study of small scale, regionally-supplying, organic farmers highlights personal meaning and purpose and societal impact of a chosen occupation. Organic farmers embody the connection between occupational behavior, its effects on larger social and ecological systems, and personal and societal health and well-being. These farmers make a daily choice to practice farming against conventional methods and go to great lengths physically, mentally, and economically to participate in an occupation they deem meaningful, well-respected, and vital to the future of our environment.

Three North Carolina organic farmers were interviewed at length for this study and additional data were gathered through participant observation at the Carrboro (NC) Farmer’s Market, one of the most highly regarded and modeled farmer’s markets in the country and through a detailed analysis of one year of the magazine Sierra, the official publication of the environmental advocacy group, the Sierra Club. I describe the nature and levels of organic farming, the individuals who choose organic options, the rationale for decisions to produce organically, and the loci of organic farming and regional farmers’ markets. The discussion focuses on the complexity and nature of the occupations of organic farming, and selling and buying at regional farmers’ markets and the individuals who choose careers, activities, or lifestyles that go against traditional and conventional practices of the dominant culture. The study of such occupational choices, based as they are on ethical concerns, has the potential to inform occupational science with respect to issues of community and ecological well-being raised by Wilcock (1998) and others.