Title

Participation Patterns of Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Household Tasks

Presenter Information

Louise Dunn, University of Utah

Start Time

29-10-2005 8:50 AM

End Time

29-10-2005 10:30 AM

Abstract

For this presentation, I propose to share findings from a study on participation patterns of children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in household tasks. I designed this study to learn more about the potential ways ADHD may influence children’s and their families’ participation in ordinary tasks at home.

Children with ADHD often demonstrate deficits in their adaptive functioning including their ability to participate in ordinary family routines such as household tasks. Their families adapt their personal and family routines to accommodate for their children’s needs for individualized attention. Two important functions for occupational therapy are to examine developmental changes in roles and responsibilities of children with ADHD and their families through household routines and to further our understanding of family occupations. Thus, the purpose for this study was to examine patterns of participation in household tasks for school-aged children with and without ADHD because of its potential impact on their preparation for living in the community as an adult and its impact on their families’ occupations.

Forty-five parents of children in grades 3 through 5 participated in this study. Twenty-two parents had children with ADHD and 23 parents had children without ADHD. Children with ADHD did not differ significantly from children without ADHD in the number of household tasks they did. However, children with ADHD did require significantly more help to perform household tasks. They required more help with Self-Care household tasks, where the outcomes primarily influenced the child (e.g., picking up one’s belongings), and with Family-Care tasks, where the outcomes influenced others (e.g., taking out the recycling). These findings support consideration of the time, efforts, and adaptations of the families in supporting the participation of their children with ADHD in family routines when planning intervention.

After presenting my findings, I want to promote discussion about family occupations such as household routines and possible occupation-based interventions.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 29th, 8:50 AM Oct 29th, 10:30 AM

Participation Patterns of Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Household Tasks

For this presentation, I propose to share findings from a study on participation patterns of children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in household tasks. I designed this study to learn more about the potential ways ADHD may influence children’s and their families’ participation in ordinary tasks at home.

Children with ADHD often demonstrate deficits in their adaptive functioning including their ability to participate in ordinary family routines such as household tasks. Their families adapt their personal and family routines to accommodate for their children’s needs for individualized attention. Two important functions for occupational therapy are to examine developmental changes in roles and responsibilities of children with ADHD and their families through household routines and to further our understanding of family occupations. Thus, the purpose for this study was to examine patterns of participation in household tasks for school-aged children with and without ADHD because of its potential impact on their preparation for living in the community as an adult and its impact on their families’ occupations.

Forty-five parents of children in grades 3 through 5 participated in this study. Twenty-two parents had children with ADHD and 23 parents had children without ADHD. Children with ADHD did not differ significantly from children without ADHD in the number of household tasks they did. However, children with ADHD did require significantly more help to perform household tasks. They required more help with Self-Care household tasks, where the outcomes primarily influenced the child (e.g., picking up one’s belongings), and with Family-Care tasks, where the outcomes influenced others (e.g., taking out the recycling). These findings support consideration of the time, efforts, and adaptations of the families in supporting the participation of their children with ADHD in family routines when planning intervention.

After presenting my findings, I want to promote discussion about family occupations such as household routines and possible occupation-based interventions.