Title

Looking Across the Levels: A Proposed Framework for Organizing and Advancing OS Knowledge (Forum)

Start Time

29-10-2005 3:00 PM

End Time

29-10-2005 4:05 PM

Abstract

Since its inception, the field of OS research has expanded rapidly to include an astonishing diversity of topics, ranging from the biological to the cultural. The breadth of this emerging body of scholarship highlights the need for a systematic framework that can both integrate existing knowledge and suggest fruitful avenues for new enquiry. One of the ways that theorists have attempted to facilitate such integration has been through the development of models incorporating systems theories. However, most of these models either focus on the individual and its subsystems, or describe occupation as a system. While both the individual and occupation are legitimate units of analysis, neither one in and of itself offers sufficient theoretical breadth to cover the diversity of contemporary OS scholarship.

In this forum, we will propose a framework grounded in complexity science that 1. expands beyond the range of existing models based in systems theories; 2. integrates across multiple levels of analysis; and 3. highlights the emergent nature of occupation. This framework will be used to guide discussion of applications for research and theory building in occupational science.

The goal of the forum is to present a new, evolving framework in a setting that allows for comprehensive discussion and feedback on the scope and applicability to OS.

Following a 20 minute presentation outlining the basic principles of complexity science and detailing the proposed framework, participants will be provided the opportunity to experiment with the framework and evaluate its utility for organizing occupational science knowledge and generating new research questions. The following are examples of questions that we may use to guide the conversation:

  1. How do the participants’ current research interests relate to the proposed framework?
  2. How might the proposed framework be used to relate occupational science knowledge to other bodies of knowledge?
  3. What areas of interest to occupational scientists are not captured by the proposed framework?

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Oct 29th, 3:00 PM Oct 29th, 4:05 PM

Looking Across the Levels: A Proposed Framework for Organizing and Advancing OS Knowledge (Forum)

Since its inception, the field of OS research has expanded rapidly to include an astonishing diversity of topics, ranging from the biological to the cultural. The breadth of this emerging body of scholarship highlights the need for a systematic framework that can both integrate existing knowledge and suggest fruitful avenues for new enquiry. One of the ways that theorists have attempted to facilitate such integration has been through the development of models incorporating systems theories. However, most of these models either focus on the individual and its subsystems, or describe occupation as a system. While both the individual and occupation are legitimate units of analysis, neither one in and of itself offers sufficient theoretical breadth to cover the diversity of contemporary OS scholarship.

In this forum, we will propose a framework grounded in complexity science that 1. expands beyond the range of existing models based in systems theories; 2. integrates across multiple levels of analysis; and 3. highlights the emergent nature of occupation. This framework will be used to guide discussion of applications for research and theory building in occupational science.

The goal of the forum is to present a new, evolving framework in a setting that allows for comprehensive discussion and feedback on the scope and applicability to OS.

Following a 20 minute presentation outlining the basic principles of complexity science and detailing the proposed framework, participants will be provided the opportunity to experiment with the framework and evaluate its utility for organizing occupational science knowledge and generating new research questions. The following are examples of questions that we may use to guide the conversation:

  1. How do the participants’ current research interests relate to the proposed framework?
  2. How might the proposed framework be used to relate occupational science knowledge to other bodies of knowledge?
  3. What areas of interest to occupational scientists are not captured by the proposed framework?