Title

Measuring and Understanding Occupational Performance: A Dynamical Systems Perspective

Presenter Information

Moses Ikiugu

Start Time

7-10-2006 3:00 PM

End Time

7-10-2006 4:05 PM

Abstract

Occupational performance is a challenging phenomenon to measure because it is difficult to capture and quantify. Part of this difficulty emanates from the fact that participation in occupations is unique for every individual. Occupational engagement patterns are as varied as human beings. It is difficult to meaningfully quantify a phenomenon that is so complex, individualized, and varied. Therefore, few instruments are available that are designed to evaluate and quantify actual performance of occupations that are personally meaningful to individuals. In this paper, three instruments will be discussed that are designed to be used in combination to achieve that objective (to identify and quantify performance of occupations that are personally meaningful to individuals). The Assessment and Intervention Instrument for Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (AIIIOT) is used to guide individuals to identify what they consider to be their purpose (personal mission) in life. They identify occupations in which regular participation would lead to achievement of that mission, and rate themselves on how they perform those occupations. The Daily Occupational Inventory (DOI) is used to identify occupations in which one is engaged every day from 6:00AM through 12:00 midnight for a specified number of days. A list of occupations and the frequency of engagement over the specified time period are then generated. The person ranks the occupations in the list in order of importance in helping him/her achieve the personal mission as stated earlier in the AIIIOT assessment. The Occupational Performance Calculation Guide (OPCG) is used to facilitate computation of a performance score based on the top five ranked occupations. The three instruments were developed by the author in collaboration with others for research and clinical use. In the paper, it will be demonstrated that use of the instruments is consistent with the dynamical systems perspective of the individual as a complex dynamical adaptive system in interaction with the environment through occupational performance. Implications for use of the instruments to research and clinical practice will be explored.

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Oct 7th, 3:00 PM Oct 7th, 4:05 PM

Measuring and Understanding Occupational Performance: A Dynamical Systems Perspective

Occupational performance is a challenging phenomenon to measure because it is difficult to capture and quantify. Part of this difficulty emanates from the fact that participation in occupations is unique for every individual. Occupational engagement patterns are as varied as human beings. It is difficult to meaningfully quantify a phenomenon that is so complex, individualized, and varied. Therefore, few instruments are available that are designed to evaluate and quantify actual performance of occupations that are personally meaningful to individuals. In this paper, three instruments will be discussed that are designed to be used in combination to achieve that objective (to identify and quantify performance of occupations that are personally meaningful to individuals). The Assessment and Intervention Instrument for Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (AIIIOT) is used to guide individuals to identify what they consider to be their purpose (personal mission) in life. They identify occupations in which regular participation would lead to achievement of that mission, and rate themselves on how they perform those occupations. The Daily Occupational Inventory (DOI) is used to identify occupations in which one is engaged every day from 6:00AM through 12:00 midnight for a specified number of days. A list of occupations and the frequency of engagement over the specified time period are then generated. The person ranks the occupations in the list in order of importance in helping him/her achieve the personal mission as stated earlier in the AIIIOT assessment. The Occupational Performance Calculation Guide (OPCG) is used to facilitate computation of a performance score based on the top five ranked occupations. The three instruments were developed by the author in collaboration with others for research and clinical use. In the paper, it will be demonstrated that use of the instruments is consistent with the dynamical systems perspective of the individual as a complex dynamical adaptive system in interaction with the environment through occupational performance. Implications for use of the instruments to research and clinical practice will be explored.