Title

Women Creating: Transforming Who We Are and What We Do

Start Time

7-10-2006 1:00 PM

End Time

7-10-2006 2:40 PM

Abstract

Literature suggests that engagement in creative occupation enhances identity formation, self-confidence, empowerment, and creativity with the elderly and individuals with chronic or mental illness. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of engagement in creative occupation upon the health and well-being of a group of well individuals. This study used ethnographic research methods to reveal the experiences of fourteen women who engaged in contemporary quiltmaking in the laboratory portion of a graduate occupational therapy elective course entitled “Women and the Creative Process.” Students learned basic sewing and quiltmaking skills, as well as basic design principles, and were then asked to make individual and group quilted wall hangings of their own design over a four month period of time. Student interviews, reflection assignments, journals, and participant observations by the instructor of the course were coded to reveal themes. As a result of their engagement in this creative occupation, students realized changes in their (1) Sense of Creativity, with Increased Risk-Taking during the Creative Process, Greater Acceptance of Mistakes during the Creative Process, Increased Levels of Creativity, Enhancement of the Creative Process through Social Support, and Greater Recognition of Many Different Types of Creativity; (2) changes in Self-Esteem and Sense of Identity, with Improvement in Self-Esteem, Greater Sense of Empowerment, and Use of the Creative Process for Self-Exploration and Self-Expression; and (3) changes in Occupational Performance in the areas of Work, Activities of Daily Living, Interpersonal Relationships, Health and Well-Being, and Creative Occupation. Students? Experience of the creative process during the making of individual wall hangings differed from that experienced during the making of the group quilt. The results of this study show the power of engagement in meaningful creative occupation upon the self-esteem, sense of identity, creativity, and occupational performance of a group of women in a community setting from a wellness perspective. This study constitutes a beginning effort within the field of occupational science to document the power of engagement in creative occupation specifically, and the power of engagement in meaningful occupation in general, upon the health and well-being of individuals, communities, and populations.

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Oct 7th, 1:00 PM Oct 7th, 2:40 PM

Women Creating: Transforming Who We Are and What We Do

Literature suggests that engagement in creative occupation enhances identity formation, self-confidence, empowerment, and creativity with the elderly and individuals with chronic or mental illness. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of engagement in creative occupation upon the health and well-being of a group of well individuals. This study used ethnographic research methods to reveal the experiences of fourteen women who engaged in contemporary quiltmaking in the laboratory portion of a graduate occupational therapy elective course entitled “Women and the Creative Process.” Students learned basic sewing and quiltmaking skills, as well as basic design principles, and were then asked to make individual and group quilted wall hangings of their own design over a four month period of time. Student interviews, reflection assignments, journals, and participant observations by the instructor of the course were coded to reveal themes. As a result of their engagement in this creative occupation, students realized changes in their (1) Sense of Creativity, with Increased Risk-Taking during the Creative Process, Greater Acceptance of Mistakes during the Creative Process, Increased Levels of Creativity, Enhancement of the Creative Process through Social Support, and Greater Recognition of Many Different Types of Creativity; (2) changes in Self-Esteem and Sense of Identity, with Improvement in Self-Esteem, Greater Sense of Empowerment, and Use of the Creative Process for Self-Exploration and Self-Expression; and (3) changes in Occupational Performance in the areas of Work, Activities of Daily Living, Interpersonal Relationships, Health and Well-Being, and Creative Occupation. Students? Experience of the creative process during the making of individual wall hangings differed from that experienced during the making of the group quilt. The results of this study show the power of engagement in meaningful creative occupation upon the self-esteem, sense of identity, creativity, and occupational performance of a group of women in a community setting from a wellness perspective. This study constitutes a beginning effort within the field of occupational science to document the power of engagement in creative occupation specifically, and the power of engagement in meaningful occupation in general, upon the health and well-being of individuals, communities, and populations.