Title

Difference in Interactions With the Home Environment Between Extremely-Low Birth-Weight and Typical Infants and Toddlers

Presenter Information

Veronique Munier
Doris Pierce

Start Time

7-10-2006 1:00 PM

End Time

7-10-2006 2:40 PM

Abstract

The establishment of a science has created a space for a rigorous understanding of the foundations of occupation. Childhood ways of doing provide a developmental base for later forms of occupational engagement. In particular, the early development of tool use and space use are central to our understanding of these forms. Children with or without disabilities develop patterns of object and space interactions that support future mastery. This paper communicates the findings of an original study whose purpose was to compare typically developing infants and toddlers with extremely-low-birth-weight and toddlers (1000 grams or less) in terms of their use of the home space and objects. This comparison is built on the theoretical description elaborated by Pierce (1996, 2001) in an original study of 18 dyads of Caucasian infants and their mothers over the first 18 months of their life in the home environment. This primary sample consisted of equal numbers of male and female infants, spread evenly across socioeconomic levels. The sample of 3 extremely-low-birth-weight infants and their mothers was recruited without restriction concerning socioeconomic levels or maternal factors and were observed at 4,6, 8 and 10 months of age. Both groups were videotaped at home in naturally-occurring situations and with typical objects. A grounded theory analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Cutcliffe, 2000) was used to describe differences between the sample of extremely-low-birth-weight infants and typically developing infants. Findings will include a description of differences within two primary perspectives: Environment (features of objects and space) including the categories of infant devices, household objects, properties of objects, object groupings, barriers, surfaces, medical devices, and Interactions (infants’ engagement with space and objects) including emergence of gaze and visual play, space use, ranging and mapping of the home space, stationary object play, mobile object play. This study suggests important aspects of infants’ engagement in the modern physical environment.

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Oct 7th, 1:00 PM Oct 7th, 2:40 PM

Difference in Interactions With the Home Environment Between Extremely-Low Birth-Weight and Typical Infants and Toddlers

The establishment of a science has created a space for a rigorous understanding of the foundations of occupation. Childhood ways of doing provide a developmental base for later forms of occupational engagement. In particular, the early development of tool use and space use are central to our understanding of these forms. Children with or without disabilities develop patterns of object and space interactions that support future mastery. This paper communicates the findings of an original study whose purpose was to compare typically developing infants and toddlers with extremely-low-birth-weight and toddlers (1000 grams or less) in terms of their use of the home space and objects. This comparison is built on the theoretical description elaborated by Pierce (1996, 2001) in an original study of 18 dyads of Caucasian infants and their mothers over the first 18 months of their life in the home environment. This primary sample consisted of equal numbers of male and female infants, spread evenly across socioeconomic levels. The sample of 3 extremely-low-birth-weight infants and their mothers was recruited without restriction concerning socioeconomic levels or maternal factors and were observed at 4,6, 8 and 10 months of age. Both groups were videotaped at home in naturally-occurring situations and with typical objects. A grounded theory analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Cutcliffe, 2000) was used to describe differences between the sample of extremely-low-birth-weight infants and typically developing infants. Findings will include a description of differences within two primary perspectives: Environment (features of objects and space) including the categories of infant devices, household objects, properties of objects, object groupings, barriers, surfaces, medical devices, and Interactions (infants’ engagement with space and objects) including emergence of gaze and visual play, space use, ranging and mapping of the home space, stationary object play, mobile object play. This study suggests important aspects of infants’ engagement in the modern physical environment.