Title

Making a Home in the World: What's at Stake in Reframing a Language for Evidence

Presenter Information

Melissa Park

Start Time

6-10-2006 12:50 PM

End Time

6-10-2006 1:55 PM

Abstract

The relationship between the discipline of occupational science and the practice of occupational therapy has been marked by bouts of controversy, as well as ambiguity. Further, in a historical context increasingly concerned with the just distribution – and this effectiveness – of health care, what constitutes the best evidence for evidence-based practice is critical to (1) practice viability in general (Jensen & Mooney, 1990, Ottenbacher, Tickle Degnen & Hasselkus, 2002), and (2) the design of interventions for lifetime conditions, such as autism spectrum disorders, in specific (Lord et al, 2005). In a climate that appears to favor behavioral or performance health-related measurements of biomedicine, what is at stake in utilizing occupational science research that foregrounds experience in relation to evidence-based practice? Based on an ethnography of therapist-children with autism interaction in an occupational therapy clinic using a sensory integrative framework, this paper proposes that what is at stake is: (1) the provision of a language of evidence that is consistent with the practice profession’s values in individual agency, experience, and action as opposed to biomedical measurements of behavioral or performance components as health outcomes, and (2) the excavation of the particularly narrative practices of action (Mattingly, 1998, 2004), where therapists engage clients in the creation of significant experiences central to healing (Marringly, 2000; Mattingly & Lawlor, 2001). This paper proposes that “making a home in the world” through one’s own actions (Reilly, 1962), and with others (M. Jackson, 1998) provides a language to frame the efficacy of occupational therapy practice that includes the underground social and symbolic work being done to create – and inhabit, if only for fleeting moments – possible homes in the world where one’s presence matters. Building on practitioner feedback and questions raised from previous presentations of this data, this presentation further suggest that evidence of “making a home in the world,” is of particular relevance for sensory integration framework outcomes which can frame treatment efficacy beyond discrete sensory-motor or social skills to the heart of the problem: Just exactly how does one make a home-carry a certain weight-in the world with others?

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Oct 6th, 12:50 PM Oct 6th, 1:55 PM

Making a Home in the World: What's at Stake in Reframing a Language for Evidence

The relationship between the discipline of occupational science and the practice of occupational therapy has been marked by bouts of controversy, as well as ambiguity. Further, in a historical context increasingly concerned with the just distribution – and this effectiveness – of health care, what constitutes the best evidence for evidence-based practice is critical to (1) practice viability in general (Jensen & Mooney, 1990, Ottenbacher, Tickle Degnen & Hasselkus, 2002), and (2) the design of interventions for lifetime conditions, such as autism spectrum disorders, in specific (Lord et al, 2005). In a climate that appears to favor behavioral or performance health-related measurements of biomedicine, what is at stake in utilizing occupational science research that foregrounds experience in relation to evidence-based practice? Based on an ethnography of therapist-children with autism interaction in an occupational therapy clinic using a sensory integrative framework, this paper proposes that what is at stake is: (1) the provision of a language of evidence that is consistent with the practice profession’s values in individual agency, experience, and action as opposed to biomedical measurements of behavioral or performance components as health outcomes, and (2) the excavation of the particularly narrative practices of action (Mattingly, 1998, 2004), where therapists engage clients in the creation of significant experiences central to healing (Marringly, 2000; Mattingly & Lawlor, 2001). This paper proposes that “making a home in the world” through one’s own actions (Reilly, 1962), and with others (M. Jackson, 1998) provides a language to frame the efficacy of occupational therapy practice that includes the underground social and symbolic work being done to create – and inhabit, if only for fleeting moments – possible homes in the world where one’s presence matters. Building on practitioner feedback and questions raised from previous presentations of this data, this presentation further suggest that evidence of “making a home in the world,” is of particular relevance for sensory integration framework outcomes which can frame treatment efficacy beyond discrete sensory-motor or social skills to the heart of the problem: Just exactly how does one make a home-carry a certain weight-in the world with others?