Title

Co-Occupation: Conceptualizing Models to Advance Thinking and Knowledge

Start Time

7-10-2006 3:00 PM

End Time

7-10-2006 4:05 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge about co-occupation. We will present conceptual models that provide a way of thinking about co-occupation and define aspects of co-occupation including shared physicality, emotionality and intentionality. We will conclude with a discussion about how co-occupation is embedded in meaning and may be seen as process or as an outcome. Occupational scientists accept the premise that humans are occupational in nature. This defines our scope of practice in occupational therapy and suggests a research agenda in occupational science. However we challenge this basic premise. Are we simply occupational beings or more so are we co-occupational beings? Humans are born as co-occupational beings. That is much of our survival depends upon mutual interaction with others. This mutual interdependence continues throughout the lifespan. Therefore the axiom guiding our thinking is that humans are co-occupational in nature. Co-occupations are social occupations that necessitate involvement of more than one person; both individuals must be active participants (Zemke & Clark, 1996; Pierce, 2003). Pierce (2003) extended Zemke and Clark’s conceptualization by stating that an individual’s response directly influences the response of another individual during co-occupational performance. Furthermore, Pierce classified co-occupation as a sub-category under the sociocultural dimension of occupation. This prior work provides a foundation for the study of co-occupation; however specific aspects or dimensions that compose co-occupations have not been identified. In this paper we will (1) define three aspects of co-occupation including shared physicality, emotionality and intentionality, (2) discuss the meaning of co-occupation as process and outcome. Participants attending this session will be introduced to novel conceptual models that may extend their thinking in regard to co-occupation.

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Oct 7th, 3:00 PM Oct 7th, 4:05 PM

Co-Occupation: Conceptualizing Models to Advance Thinking and Knowledge

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge about co-occupation. We will present conceptual models that provide a way of thinking about co-occupation and define aspects of co-occupation including shared physicality, emotionality and intentionality. We will conclude with a discussion about how co-occupation is embedded in meaning and may be seen as process or as an outcome. Occupational scientists accept the premise that humans are occupational in nature. This defines our scope of practice in occupational therapy and suggests a research agenda in occupational science. However we challenge this basic premise. Are we simply occupational beings or more so are we co-occupational beings? Humans are born as co-occupational beings. That is much of our survival depends upon mutual interaction with others. This mutual interdependence continues throughout the lifespan. Therefore the axiom guiding our thinking is that humans are co-occupational in nature. Co-occupations are social occupations that necessitate involvement of more than one person; both individuals must be active participants (Zemke & Clark, 1996; Pierce, 2003). Pierce (2003) extended Zemke and Clark’s conceptualization by stating that an individual’s response directly influences the response of another individual during co-occupational performance. Furthermore, Pierce classified co-occupation as a sub-category under the sociocultural dimension of occupation. This prior work provides a foundation for the study of co-occupation; however specific aspects or dimensions that compose co-occupations have not been identified. In this paper we will (1) define three aspects of co-occupation including shared physicality, emotionality and intentionality, (2) discuss the meaning of co-occupation as process and outcome. Participants attending this session will be introduced to novel conceptual models that may extend their thinking in regard to co-occupation.