Title

How Occupation Emerges in the Practices of Experienced Occupational Therapists

Presenter Information

Pollie Price

Start Time

6-10-2006 11:00 AM

End Time

6-10-2006 12:05 PM

Abstract

Occupation has reemerged as the central heuristic for occupational therapy practice (AOTA, 2002). However, there is currently little agreement on a definition of occupation-based practice. Some scholars have theorized that occupation-based practice occurs when therapists provide intervention in the individual’s natural context, using the individual’s occupations as therapeutic interventions (Fidler, 2000; Hocking, 2001; Pierce, 2003). Other scholars have empirically demonstrated that powerful occupational outcomes have been achieved by employing a variety of procedures and activities in a variety of contexts throughout the therapy process (Gray, 1998; Jackson, 1998; Jackson et al., 1998; Price, 2003, 2005). Despite these studies, there is very little published research evidence that examines occupation as it emerges within and over the course of intervention. The author will present data and emerging interpretations from a continuation study (Price, 2003) of the practices of experienced occupational therapists that are nominated as and self-espoused to practice from an occupation-based perspective. Data were collected through in-depth observations of four therapists and eight clients working together over the course of service, semi-structured interviews with the therapists before and after the observation, and interviews with the clients and/or family members. Narrative micro-analysis (Mattingly, 1998) was employed to consider approaches, processed and features that illuminate occupation as an idea within and across cases. Some key aspects that have emerged from the data so far include: collaboration in goal setting and intervention planning, therapeutic strategies therapeutic use of self), such as doing with, to promote competence in occupational engagement and adaptation to life situation, and promoting social participation. In order to develop a more complex, empirically grounded model of occupation-based practice, important aspects of occupation-bases practice and how they are implemented across settings and populations need to be identified. This paper promises to elicit a lively discussion from the participants regarding the place of this type of research within the Society for the Study of Occupation, as well as what constitutes occupation-based practice, by asking, “Is there a place for occupation in occupational therapy practice? Is occupation in practice a concrete intervention form, or is something more complex, such as a process of becoming?”

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Oct 6th, 11:00 AM Oct 6th, 12:05 PM

How Occupation Emerges in the Practices of Experienced Occupational Therapists

Occupation has reemerged as the central heuristic for occupational therapy practice (AOTA, 2002). However, there is currently little agreement on a definition of occupation-based practice. Some scholars have theorized that occupation-based practice occurs when therapists provide intervention in the individual’s natural context, using the individual’s occupations as therapeutic interventions (Fidler, 2000; Hocking, 2001; Pierce, 2003). Other scholars have empirically demonstrated that powerful occupational outcomes have been achieved by employing a variety of procedures and activities in a variety of contexts throughout the therapy process (Gray, 1998; Jackson, 1998; Jackson et al., 1998; Price, 2003, 2005). Despite these studies, there is very little published research evidence that examines occupation as it emerges within and over the course of intervention. The author will present data and emerging interpretations from a continuation study (Price, 2003) of the practices of experienced occupational therapists that are nominated as and self-espoused to practice from an occupation-based perspective. Data were collected through in-depth observations of four therapists and eight clients working together over the course of service, semi-structured interviews with the therapists before and after the observation, and interviews with the clients and/or family members. Narrative micro-analysis (Mattingly, 1998) was employed to consider approaches, processed and features that illuminate occupation as an idea within and across cases. Some key aspects that have emerged from the data so far include: collaboration in goal setting and intervention planning, therapeutic strategies therapeutic use of self), such as doing with, to promote competence in occupational engagement and adaptation to life situation, and promoting social participation. In order to develop a more complex, empirically grounded model of occupation-based practice, important aspects of occupation-bases practice and how they are implemented across settings and populations need to be identified. This paper promises to elicit a lively discussion from the participants regarding the place of this type of research within the Society for the Study of Occupation, as well as what constitutes occupation-based practice, by asking, “Is there a place for occupation in occupational therapy practice? Is occupation in practice a concrete intervention form, or is something more complex, such as a process of becoming?”