Title

Outdoor Play: Occupation in Context

Start Time

7-10-2006 3:00 PM

End Time

7-10-2006 4:05 PM

Abstract

Research indicates that playgrounds and other outdoor environments offer children important opportunities for play, learning and social participation that differ from those offered by indoor environments (DeBord, Hestenes, Moore, Cosco, & McGinnis, 2002; Nabors, Willoughby, & McManamin, 2001). In addition, inclusion, group membership and meaningful participation are all challenges presented when the playground environment anc activities do not match the abilities and interests of the child, resulting in a need for significant levels of adult support (Nabors & Badawi, 1997; Nabors, et al., 2001). In order for children experiencing any barriers to participation in outdoor play to benefit from these environments, we must acknowledge and understand the complexities of outdoor play as a key childhood occupation. This panel presentation is designed to examine the cultural, physical, social and temporal affordances and constraints presented in outdoor play contexts, and, both directly and indirectly, the role of the adult as co-constructor of the occupation. The primary goals of the presentation are (1) to explore ways in which research, theoretical perspectives and organized approaches to therapeutic intervention, on both individual and population levels, can be integrated to form a better understanding of outdoor play as an important childhood occupation, and (2) to generate discussion that will contribute to our understanding of how occupation and social participation emerge in playground settings.

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Oct 7th, 3:00 PM Oct 7th, 4:05 PM

Outdoor Play: Occupation in Context

Research indicates that playgrounds and other outdoor environments offer children important opportunities for play, learning and social participation that differ from those offered by indoor environments (DeBord, Hestenes, Moore, Cosco, & McGinnis, 2002; Nabors, Willoughby, & McManamin, 2001). In addition, inclusion, group membership and meaningful participation are all challenges presented when the playground environment anc activities do not match the abilities and interests of the child, resulting in a need for significant levels of adult support (Nabors & Badawi, 1997; Nabors, et al., 2001). In order for children experiencing any barriers to participation in outdoor play to benefit from these environments, we must acknowledge and understand the complexities of outdoor play as a key childhood occupation. This panel presentation is designed to examine the cultural, physical, social and temporal affordances and constraints presented in outdoor play contexts, and, both directly and indirectly, the role of the adult as co-constructor of the occupation. The primary goals of the presentation are (1) to explore ways in which research, theoretical perspectives and organized approaches to therapeutic intervention, on both individual and population levels, can be integrated to form a better understanding of outdoor play as an important childhood occupation, and (2) to generate discussion that will contribute to our understanding of how occupation and social participation emerge in playground settings.