Title

Mixed Method Investigation of Occupations of Undergraduate College Students

Presenter Information

Jenna Yeager

Start Time

7-10-2006 10:15 AM

End Time

7-10-2006 12:00 PM

Abstract

This paper will describe a study conducted to investigate the nature of occupational engagement of undergraduate students at a metropolitan university. This research utilized a mixed method approach including qualitative focus groups and an activities assessment designed for this research. The Activities Assessment was adapted from an existing tool and was designed to gather data regarding the occupations in which college undergraduates participated on a typical weekday and weekend day. A total of 112 undergraduates completed the survey. Participants were recruited from 4 campus groups, including a fraternity (N=6), sorority (N=53), general education class (N=15), and a nondenominational Christian group (N=28). Following survey completion in each campus group, participants were recruited for a follow-up focus group discussion. A total of 15 participants were involved in the focus group data collection, also representing the campus groups including the fraternity (N=14), sorority (N=11), general education class (N=7), and the non-denominational Christian group (N=?). Focus group questions were designed to gather perspectives of the participants regarding satisfaction with occupational patterns and to identify the factors that affected patterns of activity in this setting. Analysis of qualitative data via constant comparative line-by-line analysis revealed these including: participant perceived lack of control over time used; participant perceived roles and behaviors associated with status as an undergraduate, routinized time use and habits, and the priorities and values impacting choice of occupations. Descriptive statistics regarding the patterns of occupational engagement were generated from survey data and quantitative data analysis included an analysis of variance among campus groups. Results revealed significant differences among campus groups in terms of time spent engaged in various occupations. Accordingly, significant differences were found among groups in terms of time spent in social activities, family activities, spiritual activities and substance use. Discussion of this research study will include the significance of engagement in various occupations in terms of health habits for college undergraduates relative to the Healthy Campus 2010 initiative. Additionally, discussion will occur regarding the availability of methodologies for assessment of occupational engagement for different populations.

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Oct 7th, 10:15 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

Mixed Method Investigation of Occupations of Undergraduate College Students

This paper will describe a study conducted to investigate the nature of occupational engagement of undergraduate students at a metropolitan university. This research utilized a mixed method approach including qualitative focus groups and an activities assessment designed for this research. The Activities Assessment was adapted from an existing tool and was designed to gather data regarding the occupations in which college undergraduates participated on a typical weekday and weekend day. A total of 112 undergraduates completed the survey. Participants were recruited from 4 campus groups, including a fraternity (N=6), sorority (N=53), general education class (N=15), and a nondenominational Christian group (N=28). Following survey completion in each campus group, participants were recruited for a follow-up focus group discussion. A total of 15 participants were involved in the focus group data collection, also representing the campus groups including the fraternity (N=14), sorority (N=11), general education class (N=7), and the non-denominational Christian group (N=?). Focus group questions were designed to gather perspectives of the participants regarding satisfaction with occupational patterns and to identify the factors that affected patterns of activity in this setting. Analysis of qualitative data via constant comparative line-by-line analysis revealed these including: participant perceived lack of control over time used; participant perceived roles and behaviors associated with status as an undergraduate, routinized time use and habits, and the priorities and values impacting choice of occupations. Descriptive statistics regarding the patterns of occupational engagement were generated from survey data and quantitative data analysis included an analysis of variance among campus groups. Results revealed significant differences among campus groups in terms of time spent engaged in various occupations. Accordingly, significant differences were found among groups in terms of time spent in social activities, family activities, spiritual activities and substance use. Discussion of this research study will include the significance of engagement in various occupations in terms of health habits for college undergraduates relative to the Healthy Campus 2010 initiative. Additionally, discussion will occur regarding the availability of methodologies for assessment of occupational engagement for different populations.