Title

Occupation on the Edge: Occupational Science in Dialogue With Anthropology and Occupational Therapy, Panel 1 - Paper 3

Presenter Information

Virginia Dickie

Start Time

6-10-2006 11:00 AM

End Time

6-10-2006 12:05 PM

Abstract

Women make quilts to “do something” when troubled by personal tragedies and world events. Well-known examples include the AIDS quilt, the commemorative quilts after September 11, the “flood quilts” after North Carolina hurricanes, and the comfort quilts with parents’ pictures for children whose parents have been deployed to the Middle East. Women also quilt for family and friends. The quilt metaphor defines a discourse that appears to transcend political, national, and socioeconomic differences, allowing women to engage in the world creatively, based on doing and caring.

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Oct 6th, 11:00 AM Oct 6th, 12:05 PM

Occupation on the Edge: Occupational Science in Dialogue With Anthropology and Occupational Therapy, Panel 1 - Paper 3

Women make quilts to “do something” when troubled by personal tragedies and world events. Well-known examples include the AIDS quilt, the commemorative quilts after September 11, the “flood quilts” after North Carolina hurricanes, and the comfort quilts with parents’ pictures for children whose parents have been deployed to the Middle East. Women also quilt for family and friends. The quilt metaphor defines a discourse that appears to transcend political, national, and socioeconomic differences, allowing women to engage in the world creatively, based on doing and caring.