Title

Locating Occupation and Occupational (In)Justice in Postmodern Spaces and Places

Presenter Information

Cristine Carrier

Start Time

7-10-2006 10:15 AM

End Time

7-10-2006 12:00 PM

Abstract

Occupational science, perhaps the newest disciplinary “lens” in the social sciences, has declared itself an interdisciplinary science. This opens up the door to extensive theoretical and methodological discourse, most often but not exclusively with our sister social sciences. While we have begun tentative discussions of space and place, selectively drawing from other disciplinary traditions, most notably anthropology, far less attention has been paid to other “more distant” social sciences, including geography. Additionally, occupational science has yet to significantly engage with supra-disciplinary ontological approaches such as postmodernism. In order to demonstrate the relevance of postmodern spaces and places to understanding occupation and occupational (in) justice, this paper develops in three parts. In part one I will explore the meaning of the postmodern and contrast that with “modern” understandings of the world. Part two looks at the concepts of space and place as examined by scientists from a variety of disciplines within a postmodern perspective. Last, in part three, I will demonstrate how the ontological and epistemological approaches of postmodern geographies can inform and enrich the study of occupation.

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Oct 7th, 10:15 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

Locating Occupation and Occupational (In)Justice in Postmodern Spaces and Places

Occupational science, perhaps the newest disciplinary “lens” in the social sciences, has declared itself an interdisciplinary science. This opens up the door to extensive theoretical and methodological discourse, most often but not exclusively with our sister social sciences. While we have begun tentative discussions of space and place, selectively drawing from other disciplinary traditions, most notably anthropology, far less attention has been paid to other “more distant” social sciences, including geography. Additionally, occupational science has yet to significantly engage with supra-disciplinary ontological approaches such as postmodernism. In order to demonstrate the relevance of postmodern spaces and places to understanding occupation and occupational (in) justice, this paper develops in three parts. In part one I will explore the meaning of the postmodern and contrast that with “modern” understandings of the world. Part two looks at the concepts of space and place as examined by scientists from a variety of disciplines within a postmodern perspective. Last, in part three, I will demonstrate how the ontological and epistemological approaches of postmodern geographies can inform and enrich the study of occupation.