Title

Occupational Science in the Service of GAIA: A study of the Impact of Human Occupational Behavoir on Global Issues of our Time

Start Time

26-10-2007 2:00 PM

End Time

26-10-2007 3:30 PM

Abstract

do Rozario (1997), Townsend (1997), and Wicks (2005) proposed that occupational science can contribute to the process of social transformation to enable humans from all over the world to realize their full occupational potential, experience happiness and a sense of well-being, and act in ways that are consistent with a healthy earth’s ecology. Ikiugu (2007) suggested that in order to apply occupational science in this broad sense, there was need to develop a conceptual framework to help individuals learn to reflectively make occupational choices and pursue daily occupations in ways that are consistent with melioration of pertinent global issues such as poverty, material inequalities, dysfunctional social institutions, overpopulation, etc. In order to develop such a framework, there is a need to understand the extent to which individuals are aware of the power they wield in impacting such global issues through their occupational choices and performance. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to find out if there was a relationship between attitudes held by individuals towards selected global problems of concern to humankind and their willingness to change their occupational performance patterns to influence those issues positively. We also sought to establish whether there was a relationship between attitudes towards human responsibility in causing those issues and the extent to which occupational performance was perceived to affect them positively or negatively. This was a non-experimental study with a survey design. A survey questionnaire was used to obtain information about respondents’ perceptions regarding various global issues, their engagement in occupations, and their perception of how their occupational performance affected those issues. The sample consisted of 250 respondents derived from a pool of occupational therapists and occupational scientists obtained from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and the Society for the Study of Occupation (SSO): USA. In this paper, the findings of the study will be presented, and their implications for creating the proposed conceptual framework for the use of occupations to address broader social issues will be discussed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 26th, 2:00 PM Oct 26th, 3:30 PM

Occupational Science in the Service of GAIA: A study of the Impact of Human Occupational Behavoir on Global Issues of our Time

do Rozario (1997), Townsend (1997), and Wicks (2005) proposed that occupational science can contribute to the process of social transformation to enable humans from all over the world to realize their full occupational potential, experience happiness and a sense of well-being, and act in ways that are consistent with a healthy earth’s ecology. Ikiugu (2007) suggested that in order to apply occupational science in this broad sense, there was need to develop a conceptual framework to help individuals learn to reflectively make occupational choices and pursue daily occupations in ways that are consistent with melioration of pertinent global issues such as poverty, material inequalities, dysfunctional social institutions, overpopulation, etc. In order to develop such a framework, there is a need to understand the extent to which individuals are aware of the power they wield in impacting such global issues through their occupational choices and performance. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to find out if there was a relationship between attitudes held by individuals towards selected global problems of concern to humankind and their willingness to change their occupational performance patterns to influence those issues positively. We also sought to establish whether there was a relationship between attitudes towards human responsibility in causing those issues and the extent to which occupational performance was perceived to affect them positively or negatively. This was a non-experimental study with a survey design. A survey questionnaire was used to obtain information about respondents’ perceptions regarding various global issues, their engagement in occupations, and their perception of how their occupational performance affected those issues. The sample consisted of 250 respondents derived from a pool of occupational therapists and occupational scientists obtained from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and the Society for the Study of Occupation (SSO): USA. In this paper, the findings of the study will be presented, and their implications for creating the proposed conceptual framework for the use of occupations to address broader social issues will be discussed.