Title

Leisure Time: In the words of women from a traveling community

Presenter Information

Louise Kirby
Katie Robinson

Start Time

27-10-2007 9:30 AM

End Time

27-10-2007 11:00 AM

Abstract

The traveling community of Ireland are historically a minority cultural group who share nomadic, linguistic, work and leisure traditions(Moore, 2004). Irish travelers represents approximately 0.6 per cent of the total national population and are widely recognized as a marginalized group who experience high levels of social exclusion, poverty, deprivation, illiteracy, unemployment, prejudice and deprived health when compared to the non traveling or settled community. Evidence suggests that women living in a traveling community engage in limited leisure occupations (St.John, 2006). Wilcock and Whiteford (2003) identified that there is a need to consider what injustices or disadvantages occur which might restrict groups or individuals such as women from the traveling community engaging in occupations such as leisure. Furthermore it is essential to consider the values and beliefs based on culture that prevent people from engaging in what they want and need to do (Wilcock and Whiteford, 2003). An understanding of the traveling communities‚ cultural identity and heritage has the potential to eliminate social exclusion and inform occupational science. This paper will report on the findings of a qualitative study of the leisure experience of 5 women living in a traveling community in Ireland. Semi- structured interviews based on an amended version of the Occupational Performance History Index version two (OPHI-II) (Kielhofner et al., 1998) and an Interest Checklist (Kielhofner and Neville, 1983) augmented by field notes were completed. Following analysis informed by grounded theory a substantive theory regarding the enfolded nature of leisure occupations for women from the traveling community was generated. Analysis revealed mothering occupations, work and place of residence had an impact on the time available for leisure occupations for participants; enfolding leisure was a process which enabled participants to successfully balance their occupations and experience health and well being. This study illuminates the complexities of leisure and the intersection of culture and occupational performance through presenting the leisure experiences of women from the traveling community in their own words. Further research which acknowledges and identifies the highly cultural nature of occupational experiences is proposed along with research which has transformative potential for marginalized groups within society.

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Oct 27th, 9:30 AM Oct 27th, 11:00 AM

Leisure Time: In the words of women from a traveling community

The traveling community of Ireland are historically a minority cultural group who share nomadic, linguistic, work and leisure traditions(Moore, 2004). Irish travelers represents approximately 0.6 per cent of the total national population and are widely recognized as a marginalized group who experience high levels of social exclusion, poverty, deprivation, illiteracy, unemployment, prejudice and deprived health when compared to the non traveling or settled community. Evidence suggests that women living in a traveling community engage in limited leisure occupations (St.John, 2006). Wilcock and Whiteford (2003) identified that there is a need to consider what injustices or disadvantages occur which might restrict groups or individuals such as women from the traveling community engaging in occupations such as leisure. Furthermore it is essential to consider the values and beliefs based on culture that prevent people from engaging in what they want and need to do (Wilcock and Whiteford, 2003). An understanding of the traveling communities‚ cultural identity and heritage has the potential to eliminate social exclusion and inform occupational science. This paper will report on the findings of a qualitative study of the leisure experience of 5 women living in a traveling community in Ireland. Semi- structured interviews based on an amended version of the Occupational Performance History Index version two (OPHI-II) (Kielhofner et al., 1998) and an Interest Checklist (Kielhofner and Neville, 1983) augmented by field notes were completed. Following analysis informed by grounded theory a substantive theory regarding the enfolded nature of leisure occupations for women from the traveling community was generated. Analysis revealed mothering occupations, work and place of residence had an impact on the time available for leisure occupations for participants; enfolding leisure was a process which enabled participants to successfully balance their occupations and experience health and well being. This study illuminates the complexities of leisure and the intersection of culture and occupational performance through presenting the leisure experiences of women from the traveling community in their own words. Further research which acknowledges and identifies the highly cultural nature of occupational experiences is proposed along with research which has transformative potential for marginalized groups within society.