Title

How Occupation Emerges in the Practices of Occupational Therapists Across Settings

Presenter Information

Pollie Price

Start Time

26-10-2007 3:45 PM

End Time

26-10-2007 4:15 PM

Abstract

In current literature, the emphasis of the various definitions of occupation-based practice center on intervention forms and contexts. Some scholars suggest occupation-based practice is when an individual’s occupations are used as therapeutic interventions within one’s natural context (Fidler, 2000; Hocking, 2001; Pierce, 2003). Other scholars assert that powerful occupational outcomes have been achieved by employing a variety of procedures and activities in a variety of contexts (Gray, 1998; Jackson, 1998; Jackson et al., 1998; Price, 2003, 2005, in press; Price & Miner, 2007). Preliminary findings from an ongoing continuation study of peer-nominated occupation-based therapists suggest that current definitions do not represent the complexity of occupation-based practice and support the finding that occupation is both a concrete observable form, and a process of becoming that emerges in narrative meanings that are created in the therapeutic process (Price, 2003, in press; Price & Miner). The author will present findings collected with six therapists from a variety of settings: neonatal ICU, acute cardiac rehabilitation, community-based after school club, hospital-based outpatient rehabilitation, and community-based outpatient rehabilitation. The addition of therapists adds to the complexity and depth of the data and analysis regarding aspects of occupation-based practice that are similar and different across settings, thus increasing the overall generalizability of the findings. Data are collected through in-depth observations of and semi-structured interviews with each therapist and each client working together over the course of service. Narrative micro-analysis (Mattingly, 1998) is employed to consider approaches, processes and features that illuminate occupation as an idea within and across cases. New findings have emerged from analysis of additional cases; one is the tensions that can arise between the desire to address a person’s occupational life and the commitment to addressing the client’s priorities. A second aspect is that forms of occupation often look different in acute settings than in community-based settings, e.g. in biomedical settings, occupation often emerges in the more abstract narrative meanings that are generated in and through the therapy process. The presenter will facilitate a discussion on the complexities of occupation-based practice and the relevance of the research to the mission of the SSO.

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Oct 26th, 3:45 PM Oct 26th, 4:15 PM

How Occupation Emerges in the Practices of Occupational Therapists Across Settings

In current literature, the emphasis of the various definitions of occupation-based practice center on intervention forms and contexts. Some scholars suggest occupation-based practice is when an individual’s occupations are used as therapeutic interventions within one’s natural context (Fidler, 2000; Hocking, 2001; Pierce, 2003). Other scholars assert that powerful occupational outcomes have been achieved by employing a variety of procedures and activities in a variety of contexts (Gray, 1998; Jackson, 1998; Jackson et al., 1998; Price, 2003, 2005, in press; Price & Miner, 2007). Preliminary findings from an ongoing continuation study of peer-nominated occupation-based therapists suggest that current definitions do not represent the complexity of occupation-based practice and support the finding that occupation is both a concrete observable form, and a process of becoming that emerges in narrative meanings that are created in the therapeutic process (Price, 2003, in press; Price & Miner). The author will present findings collected with six therapists from a variety of settings: neonatal ICU, acute cardiac rehabilitation, community-based after school club, hospital-based outpatient rehabilitation, and community-based outpatient rehabilitation. The addition of therapists adds to the complexity and depth of the data and analysis regarding aspects of occupation-based practice that are similar and different across settings, thus increasing the overall generalizability of the findings. Data are collected through in-depth observations of and semi-structured interviews with each therapist and each client working together over the course of service. Narrative micro-analysis (Mattingly, 1998) is employed to consider approaches, processes and features that illuminate occupation as an idea within and across cases. New findings have emerged from analysis of additional cases; one is the tensions that can arise between the desire to address a person’s occupational life and the commitment to addressing the client’s priorities. A second aspect is that forms of occupation often look different in acute settings than in community-based settings, e.g. in biomedical settings, occupation often emerges in the more abstract narrative meanings that are generated in and through the therapy process. The presenter will facilitate a discussion on the complexities of occupation-based practice and the relevance of the research to the mission of the SSO.