Title

Occupational Deprivation Involving Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

Presenter Information

Emily Schulz
Penelope Moyers

Start Time

26-10-2007 2:00 PM

End Time

26-10-2007 3:30 PM

Abstract

This paper will describe a study examining occupational deprivation involving impoverished persons living with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this research study was to determine how members of an HIV/AIDS support group living in government subsidized apartment buildings in a high risk neighborhood choose to find workable solutions to challenges in their lives. Persons with HIV/AIDS are often forced to live in poverty in order to obtain the governmental support needed for life sustaining prescription medicine. As a result, many of them experience barriers to participating fully in society and in their communities. This study used an active research design as put forth by McNiff & Whitehead, (2006) in which participants acted as their own agents of change. A series of 3 focus groups was used, field notes written, transcribed, coded, and sorted. Spradley's (1976) ethnographic interviewing style and methods for coding focus group field notes were used in the three focus groups. Solution-focused action research based on findings from the first 2 focus group meetings was taken by focus group members. The first meeting discussed challenges for which solutions were desired by group members. In the second meeting field note codes from the first focus group were sorted, and an action research plan made. A third meeting involved sharing action research findings. Field notes from each focus group were transcribed, coded, and audit group reviewed. Preliminary findings suggest that individuals living with HIV/AIDS are willing and able to take action to make positive changes in their lives despite societal barriers. Initial themes regarding occupational deprivation focused on transportation, laundry, and housecleaning issues. Both barriers and facilitators to these occupations were found at the societal, agency, community, and individual levels. This study is limited to a subset of a group of people with HIV/AIDS in the Southeastern United States and therefore findings cannot be generalized to other groups. For impoverished individuals with HIV/AIDS, research into ways of facilitating occupational justice is needed. Occupational scientists and occupational therapists may benefit from this research as it represents one model in which occupational justice in populations can be facilitated ˆ regardless of their specific circumstances.

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Oct 26th, 2:00 PM Oct 26th, 3:30 PM

Occupational Deprivation Involving Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

This paper will describe a study examining occupational deprivation involving impoverished persons living with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this research study was to determine how members of an HIV/AIDS support group living in government subsidized apartment buildings in a high risk neighborhood choose to find workable solutions to challenges in their lives. Persons with HIV/AIDS are often forced to live in poverty in order to obtain the governmental support needed for life sustaining prescription medicine. As a result, many of them experience barriers to participating fully in society and in their communities. This study used an active research design as put forth by McNiff & Whitehead, (2006) in which participants acted as their own agents of change. A series of 3 focus groups was used, field notes written, transcribed, coded, and sorted. Spradley's (1976) ethnographic interviewing style and methods for coding focus group field notes were used in the three focus groups. Solution-focused action research based on findings from the first 2 focus group meetings was taken by focus group members. The first meeting discussed challenges for which solutions were desired by group members. In the second meeting field note codes from the first focus group were sorted, and an action research plan made. A third meeting involved sharing action research findings. Field notes from each focus group were transcribed, coded, and audit group reviewed. Preliminary findings suggest that individuals living with HIV/AIDS are willing and able to take action to make positive changes in their lives despite societal barriers. Initial themes regarding occupational deprivation focused on transportation, laundry, and housecleaning issues. Both barriers and facilitators to these occupations were found at the societal, agency, community, and individual levels. This study is limited to a subset of a group of people with HIV/AIDS in the Southeastern United States and therefore findings cannot be generalized to other groups. For impoverished individuals with HIV/AIDS, research into ways of facilitating occupational justice is needed. Occupational scientists and occupational therapists may benefit from this research as it represents one model in which occupational justice in populations can be facilitated ˆ regardless of their specific circumstances.